Posts Tagged ‘Recipe’

The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Bread Pudding with Bourbon Pecan Sauce

Thursday, October 24th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Bread pudding is a bread-based dessert popular in many countries’ cuisines. In other languages, its name is a translation of “bread pudding” or even just “pudding,” for example “pudín” or “budín” in Spanish.

There is no fixed recipe, but it is usually made using stale or left-over bread, and some combination of ingredients like milk, eggs, sugar or syrup to make custard, along with dried fruit and spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, mace or vanilla. As you might expect, I prefer to add lots of Choclatique chocolate. The bread is soaked in the custard, mixed with the other ingredients and then baked.

It may be served with a sweet sauce of some sort, such as chocolate, whiskey, rum or caramel sauces, but is typically sprinkled with sugar and eaten warm in squares or slices. In Canada it is often made with maple syrup. In Malaysia, bread pudding is eaten with custard sauce. In Hong Kong, it is typically served with vanilla cream or ice cream.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 45 minutes
Ready In: 60 minutes
Yield: 12 servings

Ingredients:
For the Sauce:

1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 1/4 cups heavy whipping cream
1 cup chopped toasted pecans
2 tablespoons bourbon

For the Pudding:
2 cups whole milk
2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 cup granulated sugar
8 ounce Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate
8 large eggs
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 pound egg bread, sliced into 1 inch pieces

Directions:
To Make the Sauce:

  1. In a heavy large saucepan stir 1 1/4 cups sugar and water over medium heat until sugar dissolves.
  2. Mix in the corn syrup and lemon juice. Increase the heat and boil without stirring until syrup turns deep amber brushing down sides of the pan with wet pastry brush and swirling the pan occasionally.
  3. Remove from the heat and pour in 1 1/4 cups cream (Be Careful—The Mixture Will Bubble Up).
  4. Stir over low heat until the caramel is melted and smooth.
  5. Increase the heat and boil until the sauce is reduced to about 1 2/3 cups, stirring often, about 4 minutes.
  6. Remove from heat; mix in pecans and bourbon; set aside.

To Make the Pudding:

  1. Preheat oven to 350º F.
  2. Combine the milk, 2 cups of cream and 1 cup of sugar in a medium saucepan over medium high heat, stir until the sugar dissolves and the mixture comes to boil. Remove from heat, add the chocolate; stir until smooth. Let the mixture cool for about 5 minutes.
  3. In large bowl beat the eggs with the vanilla extract to blend. Gradually whisk in cooled chocolate mixture.
  4. Add the bread cubes and let them stand until bread absorbs some of the custard, stirring occasionally, about 60 minutes. Transfer mixture to a 13 x 9 x 2-inch glass baking dish. Cover with foil.
  5. Bake until set in center, about 45 minutes.
  6. Remove the foil to lightly brown the top; no more than 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack.
  7. Serve pudding warm or at room temperature with warm sauce.

ChefSecret: For the bread I like to use stale challah (Jewish egg bread), brioche (French egg bread) or even King’s Hawaiian Bread with the crusts removed. In a pinch you can use stale French bread also remembering to remove the crust. Using stale bread give the pudding a little more texture and bite.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Cake Doughnuts

Friday, October 11th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Everyone loves doughnuts because there are so many wonderful flavors from which to choose. There are the warm raised, glazed doughnuts—the flavor that made Krispy Kreme famous—frosted vanilla, cherry, strawberry, maple and even flavors with sprinkles and decoratifs. You can buy a cruller, a cinnamon twist or even an apple fritter that is made with leftover scraps and pieces layered with canned apple pie filling. And then there’s iced chocolate cake doughnuts.

There is a famous doughnut shop nearby Los Angeles International Airport. This iconic landmark is located in the heart of Inglewood and has been featured in countless films, music videos, and even inspired the landscape of Springfield, where Homer Simpson and the gang call home. If you get there just as the doughnuts are just coming out of the fryer, they have a wonderful texture providing a great, crunch in every bite. That’s when these magic circles of fried dough are at their peak of perfection. I think you’ll find with my doughnut recipe you will get that special fresh-out-of-the-oil CRUNCH every time.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 15 minutes (the dough, not you)
Fry Time: 3 minutes
Ready In: 30 minutes
Yield: 12 Doughnuts and 12 Doughnut Holes

Ingredients:
1 3/4 cups + 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
2/3 cup granulated sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
3 tablespoons melted butter
1/3 cup Choclatique Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips
1/2 cup whole milk
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract
1 large egg, beaten
1 quart oil for frying
3 tablespoons of confectioner’s sugar
1 tablespoon Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, sift together 1-3/4 cups flour, cocoa powder, sugar, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and cardamom.
  2. Cut in the butter and the mini chocolate chips until crumbly.
  3. Stir in the milk, extracts and egg until smooth.
  4. Lightly knead the dough in the bowl and then turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Roll to 1/4-inch thickness.
  5. Cut with a doughnut cutter, or use two round biscuit cutters of different sizes. Cover the dough with a damp kitchen towel for 15 minutes to allow the dough to rest.
  6. Heat the oil in deep-fryer or large pot to 375º F. Use a frying thermometer to make sure the temperature is correct.
  7. Carefully drop doughnuts and doughnut holes into hot oil, a few at a time. Flip them over after about 30 seconds to make sure they round on both sides.
  8. Fry for about 3 minutes, turning once more until both sides are golden brown.
    Do not overcrowd pan or oil may overflow causing a fire hazard.
  9. Drain on the fried doughnuts on paper towels.
  10. Combine confectioner’s sugar and cocoa powder together and then dust doughnuts with the mixture or frost with your favorite chocolate glaze.

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Cherry-Chocolate Fondue

Friday, October 4th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

We’ve all done it—dunked a piece of fruit, cake square or cookie into hot fudge or chocolate sauce—and loved it. The Swiss originally called Fondue Käss mit Wein zu kochen, but that’s a little long-winded for a national dish. Actually, the original fondue dishes were popularized with cheese being the key ingredient. Fondue’s origins stem from an area that covers Switzerland, France (Rhone Alps) and Italy (Piedmont and Aosta valley), but today fondue can be found throughout Europe.

After World War II, “fondue” has been generalized to other dishes in which a food is dipped into a communal pot of hot liquid. One such dish is chocolate fondue, in which pieces of fruit or cake are dipped into a melted chocolate mixture. You’ll find in this simple recipe the brandy gives it the fondue sparkle; the coffee gives depth and the cinnamon gives it definition. If you drop a piece of fruit or cake into the fondue pot you must kiss everyone of the opposite sex.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minute
Ready In: 15 minutes
Serves: 6 people

Ingredients:
4 tablespoon heavy cream
1 cup Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate Pastilles
1 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
2 tablespoons cherry brandy
1 tablespoon strong brewed coffee
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:

  1. Heat the cream in a fondue pot over a low flame (or in a saucepan over low heat).
  2. Add the 2 types of chocolate chips, brandy, coffee and cinnamon.
  3. Heat until melted, stirring occasionally. Serve at once.

ChefSecret: This is the perfect fondue for dipping fresh fruit—apples, pears or pineapple during the fall and winter holiday season and stone fruit (peaches, apricots or nectarines), honeydew, cantaloupe during the spring and summer months.

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Chocolate, Chocolate Chip Cannoli

Monday, September 30th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Cannoli originated in Sicily, at the southern tip of Italy. Kind of like an Italian cheesecake in a tube, it is an essential part of Sicilian culture. Throughout the years cannoli has become as popular in America as they are in Italy.

Cannoli has two parts—the tube-shaped shells of fried pastry dough and a filling of sweet, creamy flavored ricotta. Cannoli range in size from “cannulicchi,” no bigger than a little finger, to large diameter, cigar-sized proportions.

My recipe adds chocolate flavor to the traditional ricotta cream filling. While they take about an hour or so to make they’re certainly worth it as a finale to a simple bowl of meatballs and spaghetti or a great Italian culinary feast. Wow! Now that’s Italian!

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Ready In: 60 minutes
Yield: 10-12 Stuffed Cannoli

Ingredients:
For the Shells:

2 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
2 tablespoons shortening
1 egg white (large egg)
3/4 cup red wine (inexpensive Chianti will do nicely)
1 1/2 quarts oil for deep frying

For the Filling:
1 1/2 pounds ricotta cheese
1/2 cup sifted confectioners’ sugar
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
3/4 cup Choclatique Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips
1 1/2 tablespoons chopped, candied orange peel
1/4 cup rough chopped, roasted pistachio nuts
1/2 cup ground, roasted pistachio nuts

Directions:
To Make the Cannoli Shells:

  1. In a medium bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg. Blend in the shortening and egg white. Add the red wine one tablespoon at a time until the mixture forms a ball. Knead the dough just to bring it together. Cover and let rest for half an hour.
  2. Heat oil in deep-fryer to 375º F.
  3. Divide dough in half. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/8 inch thickness. Cut into 4 inch long ovals. Using a fork or pairing knife, poke holes in the ovals to prevent puffing.
  4. Place a metal cannoli tube onto the oval lengthwise and roll up with edges overlapping; seal with a dab of egg white.
  5. Fry cannoli shells 2 or 3 at a time in the hot oil. When golden brown and lightly blistered, remove from the oil to drain on paper towels. Remove tubes.

To Make the Cannoli Filling:

  1. In a medium bowl, mix together the ricotta cheese, confectioners’ sugar and cocoa powder. Fold in the vanilla extract, chocolate chips, candied orange peel and chopped pistachios.
  2. Chill the ricotta mixture for at least half an hour before filling shells.
  3. Drain off any excess liquid and spoon the filling into a pastry bag.
  4. Carefully fill the cannoli shells and smooth off at the edges.
  5. Dip the open ends of the filled cannoli in the ground pistachios so that it clings to the cheese filling.
  6. Keep refrigerated until ready to serve.

ChefSecrets: The shells can be made a day or two ahead of time and held in an air tight container. For a creamier filling, replace 8 Oz. of the ricotta cheese with 8 Oz. of mascarpone cheese or cream cheese.

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From Rome with Love

Friday, September 20th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

The earliest known reference to “French” toast is actually found in the Apicius, a collection of Roman recipes written in ancient Latin or Vulgar dating back to the 4th century. The recipe directs the “house slave cook” to soak the bread in milk—not eggs—although the ancient editor suggests eggs might make it richer. The dish doesn’t next appear until it is listed as a 14th-century German recipe under the name “Arme Ritter.”

There are references to recipes for “pain perdu” in several 15th-century English books. A 1660 recipe for “French Toasts” is different, but is nothing more than toasted bread soaked in wine, sugar, and orange juice. A similar dish, suppe dorate, was popular in the Middle Ages in England, although it is rumored that the English might have stolen the recipe from the Normans who had a dish called tostees dorees.

French toast topped with maple syrup, fresh fruit and whipped cream is a rather American recipe. Slices of bread are soaked or dipped in mixture of beaten eggs and milk or cream. The slices of egg-coated bread are fried on both sides until they are browned and cooked through. Day-old bread is often recommended by chefs because stale bread will soak up more egg mixture without falling apart.

The cooked slices are often topped with jam, butter, peanut butter, honey, maple syrup, golden syrup, fruit syrup, molasses, apple sauce, whipped cream, fruit, chocolate, cinnamon-sugar, yogurt, powdered sugar, marmalade and even ice cream topped with toasted pecans or almonds.

Stuffed French toast is a sandwich of two pieces of French toast filled with bananas, strawberries, or other fruit. It is usually topped with butter, maple syrup, and powdered sugar. But now there are Chocolate French Toast Sandwiches which can be served as a great breakfast or brunch entrée or an elegant dinner-time dessert.

Chocolate French Toast Sandwiches

In my family when I was growing up French toast was considered a weekend treat. I loved the flavors of the eggy custard blended with sandwich bread and topped with maple syrup and dusted with confectioners’ sugar. In this recipe I take it one step further to create a wonderful, chocolaty, Authentically American cousin of the original French toast.

Ingredients:
8 large eggs
1/4 cup confectioner’s sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/2 cup half and half
8 slices of brioche bread, thick sliced (day old or stale bread works best)
6 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons honey
1/2 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
1 banana thinly sliced
1/3 cup chocolate syrup

Directions:

  1. In a blender jar mix together the eggs, sugar, vanilla extract, cocoa powder and half and half until the cocoa powder is completely absorbed, about 3 minutes, to make the chocolate custard. Pour the mixture in a large glass roasting pan.
  2. Place the cut brioche slices in the roasting pan to absorb the egg custard; after about 30 seconds gently turn the pieces over to absorb the rest of the custard.
  3. Using a large skillet or griddle, melt the butter and honey; when bubbly carefully place the bread in the skillet and sauté until lightly crisp and then turn over to cook the other side.
  4. Place a 1/4 cup of the chips on four of the slices of brioche and top with the other slices. After the chocolate chips melt top each with a few slices of cut banana and drizzle with chocolate syrup.
  5. Cut diagonally and serve immediately.

ChefSecret: Can’t find brioche bread? Use thick cut white bread, Texas toast or Jewish challah bread. In place of the bananas you can substitute fresh berries or sliced grilled peaches in the summer months.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chipotle-Chocolate Crackers

Friday, September 13th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I like to think of these as richly dark and delightfully crisp chocolate crackers, but with a nice firm spicy finish at the end—a rather delightful surprise and satisfying little burn on the back of your tongue. It’s the kind of heat that will get your attention and perk up your taste buds.

Spice and chocolate is no new thing. Actually, it’s the perfect marriage of flavors and that’s the way it all started when Montezuma had is cocoa beans blended with cinnamon and chili and frothed into a royal drink.

So it’s clear that chocolate and spice combinations aren’t anything new, and the appeal is widespread; they’re more than just your average chocolate treat. With these cookies, we take advantage of the unique smoky notes and robust flavors of the chipotle chili, and the smoked jalapeño pepper, which balance the dark chocolate perfectly in a truly unique and decadent treat.

These crackers can be eating on many occasions. I like to eat these with a salad or soup, with a cup of coffee, hot chocolate or even with a very cold glass of milk.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Freeze Time: 30 minutes
Bake Time: 8 to 10 minutes
Cool Time: 10 minutes
Ready In: 1 hour 10 minutes
Yield: 25 to 30 Crackers

Ingredients:
1 3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
2 tablespoons Choclatique Black Onyx Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 teaspoons sharp paprika
1 teaspoons chipotle chili pepper
1 teaspoon sea salt
3/4 cup (12 tablespoons) softened unsalted butter
1/3 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted
1/3 cup granulated sugar
2 large egg whites
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 cup finely ground toasted blanched almonds

Directions:

  1. Sift the flour, cocoa powders, paprika, chipotle chili pepper and salt together in a medium-sized mixing bowl and set aside.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter with an electric mixer on medium speed for about 2 minutes. Add both sugars and beat for 2 more minutes.
  3. Reduce to low speed, add the egg whites, vanilla extract and beat 1 minute longer. The egg whites will separate in the batter, but the dough will begin to come together when the flour mixture is added.
  4. Add the flour mixture and mix just until it is absorbed into the dough. Stir in the ground almonds with a spatula or wooden spoon.
  5. Turn the dough out onto your work surface. It should be smooth and soft. Divide it in half, and shape each half into a disk. Place a disk between two sheets of wax paper or plastic food film and roll it out to a 1/8-inch thickness. Repeat with remaining disk of dough.
  6. Freeze the rolled-out dough for at least 30 minutes.
  7. With a rack positioned in the center of your oven, preheat the oven to 350º F.
  8. Line two baking sheets with parchment or silicone baking mats.
  9. Working with half the dough at a time, use a 2-inch biscuit cutter or cookie cutter to cut as many crackers as you can save the scraps of dough to be rerolled later.
  10. Place the cut cracker dough about an inch apart on one of the prepared baking sheets.
  11. Bake 10 to 12 minutes, rotating the baking sheet at the halfway point. Remove from the oven and cool for 5 minutes. Transfer the baked crackers to a wire rack and cool to room temperature.
  12. Repeat with remaining dough, using cooled baking sheet.
  13. Combine the scraps of dough, shape into a disk, roll and freeze for about 15 minutes. Cut and bake as above.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Almost, But Not Quite A Baby Ruth® Candy Bar

Friday, September 6th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

It was in the late ‘60’s. Jim Jordon and I hopped on to a United Airlines plane—first class no less—and headed off to Chicago. Jim was a famous commercial director and I was the house art director at Cascade Pictures. We were going to meet with the president of the Curtiss Candy Company about designing and producing their first television commercial for Baby Ruth Candy. I had my sketches and story boards all packed up and Jim had his smile and wit. The meeting went well and we were hired. When we left, we were both given a gift box of Curtiss Candy products (Baby Ruth, Oh Henry, Butterfingers). I was never bashful about eating candy bars of any kind (still not), and a Baby Ruth was no exception. I loved the flavor combination of real chocolate, nougat and peanuts. The following recipe is a very good imitation of a great American tradition—Baby Ruth.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Ready In: 30 minutes
Yield: About 18 bars

Ingredients:
1 cup peanut butter (I like Skippy)
1 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
6 cups corn flakes cereal (or you can also use crispy puffed rice)
1 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
1 cup salted Virginia peanuts
2 cups of Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate Pastilles, melted

Directions:

  1. Butter a 9 x 13-inch baking dish.
  2. In a large saucepan over medium heat, combine the peanut butter, corn syrup, brown sugar and white sugar. Cook, stirring occasionally, until smooth. Remove from heat and quickly mix in the corn flakes, chocolate chips and peanuts until evenly coated.
  3. Press the entire mixture gently into the prepared baking dish. Allow to cool completely before cutting into bars.
  4. Melt the milk chocolate chips in a double boiler or in a microwave oven.
  5. Roll the bars into individual round logs and dip them into the melted milk chocolate to enrobe.
  6. Place them on waxed paper to let them set-up. Eat immediately or twist-wrap them in wax paper to savor later on.

The Baby Ruth Back Story: Do you know how the Baby Ruth got its name? Although the name of the candy bar sounds a lot like the name of the famous baseball player, Babe Ruth, the Curtiss Candy Company claimed it was named after President Grover Cleveland’s daughter, Ruth. The candy maker named the bar “Baby Ruth” in 1921, as Babe Ruth’s fame was on the rise, over 30 years after President Cleveland had left the White House. The company did not negotiate an endorsement deal with the Babe. Was the story true or was it a devious way to avoid having to pay the Babe any royalties? Or, was it actually named after the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Williamson, the candy makers who actually developed and sold the original formula to Curtiss Candy in 1921?

Note: Baby Ruth is a registered trademark of NestleUSA.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s White Chocolate Chip Lemon Brownies

Friday, August 30th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Our customers love our Snowy White Chocolate! In fact, more customers purchase our 10-pound blocks of white chocolate than blocks of Dark or Milk Chocolate which is counter to most consumer trends. No kidding, there are days when we send out hundreds of pounds of Snowy White Chocolate. We wanted to find out why, so we inserted a questionnaire in every box of Snowy White that we shipped to see what recipes customers were making. I thought it would be fun to share some of the best of the best recipes that were sent.

If you love yummy, tart lemon bars then this recipe is one you’re going to want to make immediately. It is more or less a traditional lemon bar with the addition of Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate and White Chocolate Chips. Please use fresh lemon juice and zest—it makes a big difference.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 25 to 27 minutes
Cool Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 12 bars

Ingredients:
For the brownie:

2 tablespoons lemon zest, freshly grated
3 tablespoons lemon juice, freshly squeezed
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened (plus a little more for the pan)
1/3 cup Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate, melted
2 large eggs
1/4 cup Choclatique White Chocolate Chips

For the tart lemon glaze:
1 rounded cup powdered sugar
8 teaspoons lemon zest
4 tablespoon lemon juice

Directions:

    1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Butter and flour an 8 x 8-inch baking pan, shaking out the excess flour and set aside.
    3. Zest and juice the two lemons and set aside.
    4. In the bowl of an electric mixture fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the flour, sugar, salt and softened butter until combined.
    5. Add the melted white chocolate and continue to mix.
    6. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, lemon zest, and lemon juice until combined.
    7. Pour the egg mixture into the flour mixture and beat for 2 minutes at medium speed until smooth and creamy.
    8. Fold in the white chocolate chips.
    9. Pour into baking dish and bake for 25-27 minutes, you should start to see the edges turn a light golden brown. Do not overbake, or the bars will be too dry.
    10. Allow to cool completely before glazing.
    11. Sift the powdered sugar and whisk with lemon zest and juice.
    12. Spread half the glaze over the brownies with a rubber spatula and let the glaze set for about 10 minutes.
    13. Spread the other half of the glaze over the bars, and let it set (it will not harden like most lemon glaze bars).
    14. Cut into bars and serve.

ChefSecret: Lightly coat the chocolate chips with a dusting of all-purpose flour before folding in to the batter. This will prevent the chocolate chips for settling to the bottom of the bar while baking.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Batter Fresh Fruit Cobbler

Friday, August 23rd, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Batter cobblers are a lazy baker’s rustic country pie. Well, maybe that’s an over-generalization. However you classify them, they are the perfect dessert for a summer dinner or afternoon picnic. They’re easy to make. They transport easily and don’t require any refrigeration. All this being said, they are as delicious as any American pie and you don’t have to worry about nicking the ends of the crust and damaging that picture-perfect look. In fact, you won’t find a simpler, more delicious homemade dessert than a fruit cobbler. I added a Choclatique touch to the batter with a little cocoa powder. Go ahead and splurge and top it with a little freshly-whipped Cinnamon Chantilly or a scoop of ice cream.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Bake Time: 40 to 50 minutes
Cooling Time: 30 minutes
Ready In: 1 hour 20 minutes
Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients:
5 tablespoons butter
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Nutra Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup milk
2 cups of sliced fresh Freestone peaches
1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon fresh lemon zest
1 tablespoon crystalline sugar

Directions:

  1. Adjust oven rack to upper-middle position, and heat oven to 350º F.
  2. Put butter in an 8-inch square or 9-inch round pan (cast iron works best); set in oven to melt. When butter has melted, remove pan from oven.
  3. Whisk the flour, cocoa powder, 3/4 cup of sugar, baking powder and salt in a small bowl. Add the milk; whisk to form a smooth batter.
  4. Pour batter into pan, and then scatter fruit over evenly over the batter. Sprinkle the lemon juice and zest over the fruit. Sprinkle with crystalline sugar.
  5. Do not mix. As the cobbler bakes the batter will rise up over the fruit creating a flaky, crisp pastry.
  6. Bake until batter browns and fruit bubbles, 40 to 50 minutes. Serve warm (not hot) or at room temperature with a dollop of whipped cream, a small scoop of ice cream, or my Cinnamon Chantilly (see recipe below), if desired.

ChefSecret: If you don’t have fresh peaches you can use nectarines, or whole blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, pitted cherries or a combination of fruits. You can also use a 12-ounce package of frozen berries.

Cinnamon Chantilly

Ingredients:
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:

  1. Combine all ingredients and whisk to stiff peaks.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Mocha Panna Cotta

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

This is an easy-to make Italian custard found in the fanciest of Italian restaurants. It is usually made without the coffee and cocoa powder, but I decided to take it up a notch and give it a tiramisu-like flavor. It is a perfect spring and summer time dessert that will go with any Italian-themed dinner (or for any other cuisine for that matter… well maybe not so well with Chinese food or Sushi). I like to top this with warm crème anglaise or chocolate sauce and/or fresh, sweet berries. Kept covered with plastic wrap it will keep for 3 days in the refrigerator.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Cooling Time: 4 hours (longer is better)
Ready In: 4 hours 15 minutes
Yield: 6 Servings

Ingredients:
1/3 cup whole milk
1 (.25 ounce) envelope unflavored gelatin (Knox)
2 teaspoons instant coffee crystals
2 tablespoons Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
2 1/2 cups heavy cream
2/3 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. Pour the milk into a small bowl and stir in the gelatin. Set aside.
  2. In a medium size saucepan, stir together the heavy cream, instant coffee, cocoa powder and sugar. Set over medium heat bringing to a full boil. Watch carefully, as cream when heated will quickly rise to the top of the pan and may overflow.
  3. Pour the gelatin and milk into the cream, stirring until completely dissolved. Cook for one minute longer, stirring constantly.
  4. Remove from the heat, stir in the vanilla and pour into six individual ramekin dishes.
  5. Cool the ramekins uncovered at room temperature. This will prevent moisture from forming on the top of the pudding.
  6. When cool, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 4 hours before serving.

ChefSecret: I like to take make a fresh seasonal berry sauce—raspberry, blackberry or boysenberry—to take advantage of the spring flavors of fresh fruit. Just blend a tablespoon of sugar with fresh berries and lightly crush. Let them marinate in the refrigerator for about an hour before serving. You can also enrich the berries further with a tablespoon of orange-flavored liqueur. Spoon on the fresh berry sauce right before serving.

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