Posts Tagged ‘Desserts’

The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Gingerbread Cake

Friday, September 26th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is an attention-grabbing, wonderful holiday cake that you will want to make all year round. It is my favorite dark, moist, chewy and nicely-spiced ginger bread cake. Of course I’ve taken the liberty to add a measure of cocoa powder and chocolate to make it perfectly Choclatique-worthy. It can’t help being awesome, fragrant, and smelling a lot like Christmas. I give this cake 5 spicy “yums.”

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 40-45 minutes
Yield: Serves 10 to 12

Ingredients:
1 cup dark, blackstrap molasses
1 cup boiling water
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup vegetable oil
2 large eggs
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon powdered ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon mace
1/8 teaspoon sweet anise
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup Choclatique Ebony Dark Chocolate Pastilles

For the topping:
8 ounces heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions:

  • Preheat an oven to 350° F.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine the molasses and the boiling water and mix.
  • Add the sugar and vegetable oil and stir well. Let this mixture cool to lukewarm before adding the eggs to prevent them from cooking and mix well.
  • Add the flour, baking soda, spices and salt and mix until you have a smooth batter.
  • Fold in the white chocolate pastilles.
  • Pour the batter into a greased 9 x 13 pan and bake 30 to 40 minutes, until it is springy and pulling away from the sides of the pan or until a cake tester inserted in the middle comes out clean.
  • Serve with dollops of whipped cream.

For the topping:

  1. Place a large bowl with the beaters for your mixer in the freezer. Make sure the cream itself is thoroughly chilled as well.
  2. Sift the confectioner’s sugar into a bowl.
  3. Pour the cream into the frozen bowl and beat at high speed until it begins to thicken. Gradually add the confectioners’ sugar and beat until soft peaks form. Add the vanilla extract. Keep beating the cream for about 5 to 8 minutes, until the cream is whipped and stiff. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Cake Epitome

Friday, July 25th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

There’s a lot to be said when it comes to chocolate cake. But just like with everything else in life, not all chocolate cakes are created equal. The most important thing about a great chocolate cake is that it actually has to taste like chocolate. The consistency should be moist and dense, because chocolate is dense and that’s what you get from this recipe. When it comes to chocolate, this recipe takes the cake. It’s a simple and basic and packs a big chocolate wallop. It is the companion cake to our Choclatique Epitome truffle collection inspired by the growing demand for fine, dark, heirloom chocolate. It is all that the name implies; after all it’s from Choclatique.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 40 to 45 minutes
Yield: Serves 12

Ingredients:
For the cake:

3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 Cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, 3 tablespoons for dusting
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups granulated sugar
1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup buttermilk
1 large egg
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 cup boiling water
1/4 cup very hot coffee
1/4 cup Grand Marnier (or other strong orange-flavored liqueur)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon pure almond extract
1/4 Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips

For the frosting:
3 oz. cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup unsalted butter (1 stick), softened
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon almond extract
1/2 teaspoon fresh orange zest
1 cup confectioner’s sugar

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 350°.
  2. In a large bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa powder and salt.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar, oil, buttermilk and egg; mix well.
  4. Add the dry ingredients to the egg mixture and beat well.
  5. Add the baking soda and then add the boiling water, hot coffee and orange liqueur. Mix well.
  6. Stir in the vanilla and almond extracts.
  7. Dust the chocolate chips with cocoa powder to prevent them from sinking to the bottom of the cake. Fold the chips into the batter. The batter will be very thin.
  8. Pour into a greased and cocoa powder dusted 9 x 13 cake pan and bake for 40 to 45 minutes or until a cake tester comes out clean.
  9. Let the cake cool completely before frosting.

For the frosting:

  1. Cream together the cream cheese, orange zest and butter until fluffy.
  2. Add the vanilla and almond extracts, sift in the powdered sugar and beat until well blended, creamy and smooth.

ChefSecret: You can make it in advance and keep it in the freezer – it still tastes great!

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Old Fashioned Chocolate Cookies

Friday, July 18th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I love to share vintage family cookie recipes. These Old Fashioned Chocolate Cookies are circa 1960s. Baking cookies is a wonderful holiday tradition, and there are but few yummier treats you must have on your Christmas (or year-round) cookies plate of every year—this is one of them. They are crisp, delicious and not too sweet—just an old-fashioned cookie perfect for the holiday baking season. Need something to give; think chocolate cookies for homemade holiday gifts. Let the baking begin!

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Chill Time: 2 hours
Bake Time: 8 to 12 minutes per sheet pan
Yield: 3 dozen

Ingredients:
1/2 cup shortening
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup dark corn syrup
2 large eggs, beaten
1/2 tsp. salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 cups flour
1/2 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder or Choclatique Rouge Cocoa Powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 cup confectioner’s sugar

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, cream together the shortening and sugar.
  2. Add the corn syrup, eggs, salt and vanilla extract and mix well.
  3. In a separate bowl, sift together the cardamom, cinnamon, flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and baking powder.
  4. Gradually add to the creamed mixture and beat well.
  5. Scrape down the dough and divide into two portions. Wrap with food film and chill for at least 2 hours.
  6. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  7. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut with your favorite cookie cutters.
  8. Bake on greased cookie sheets for 8 to 12 minutes, depending on size of cutouts.
  9. Cool completely.
  10. Dust with confectioner’s sugar.

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Cherry-Chocolate Fondue

Friday, October 4th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

We’ve all done it—dunked a piece of fruit, cake square or cookie into hot fudge or chocolate sauce—and loved it. The Swiss originally called Fondue Käss mit Wein zu kochen, but that’s a little long-winded for a national dish. Actually, the original fondue dishes were popularized with cheese being the key ingredient. Fondue’s origins stem from an area that covers Switzerland, France (Rhone Alps) and Italy (Piedmont and Aosta valley), but today fondue can be found throughout Europe.

After World War II, “fondue” has been generalized to other dishes in which a food is dipped into a communal pot of hot liquid. One such dish is chocolate fondue, in which pieces of fruit or cake are dipped into a melted chocolate mixture. You’ll find in this simple recipe the brandy gives it the fondue sparkle; the coffee gives depth and the cinnamon gives it definition. If you drop a piece of fruit or cake into the fondue pot you must kiss everyone of the opposite sex.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minute
Ready In: 15 minutes
Serves: 6 people

Ingredients:
4 tablespoon heavy cream
1 cup Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate Pastilles
1 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
2 tablespoons cherry brandy
1 tablespoon strong brewed coffee
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:

  1. Heat the cream in a fondue pot over a low flame (or in a saucepan over low heat).
  2. Add the 2 types of chocolate chips, brandy, coffee and cinnamon.
  3. Heat until melted, stirring occasionally. Serve at once.

ChefSecret: This is the perfect fondue for dipping fresh fruit—apples, pears or pineapple during the fall and winter holiday season and stone fruit (peaches, apricots or nectarines), honeydew, cantaloupe during the spring and summer months.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Peanut Butter Cup Cookies

Friday, June 21st, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

H. B. Reese, a former dairy farmer from Hershey, Pennsylvania, created the original Peanut Butter Cup in 1928. A peanut butter cup is a wonderful confection filled with peanut butter and enrobed in chocolate. At Choclatique, we make our own artisan blend of peanut butter filling for our very special truffles that are creamier and tastier than even the original.

I took the peanut butter cup one step further with our Peanut Butter Cup Cookie. This is a wonderful peanut butter cookie baked in a small muffin tin with a peanut butter cup pressed into a hot, out-of-the-oven cookie before it has time to set. This is a peanut butter cookie fancier’s dream.

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Baked Time: 10 minutes
Ready In: 1 hour 35 minutes
Yield: 12 to 15 cookies

Ingredients:
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1 egg, beaten
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 tablespoons whole milk
12 Choclatique Milk or Dark Peanut Butter Truffles

Directions:

  • Preheat the oven to 375º F.
  • Sift together the flour, salt and baking soda and set aside.
  • Cream together the butter, sugar, peanut butter and brown sugar until very fluffy.
  • Beat in the egg, vanilla extract and milk. Add the flour mixture; mix well. Shape into 12 to 15 balls and place each into an ungreased mini muffin pan.
  • Bake for about 8 minutes until just turn light brown. Remove from the oven and immediately press a peanut butter cup into the hot center of each cookie.
  • Cool on a rack.
  • Carefully remove each cookie from the pan.

 

ChefSecret: There is only one way I know to make a great thing even better. Press in a Choclatique Peanut Butter & Jelly Truffle to add an additional flavor thrill.

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Helms Bakery

Monday, February 21st, 2011
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In 1926, Paul Helms of New York took an early retirement and moved his family to Southern California and its mild climate. Helms started construction on a building between Washington and Venice Boulevards in 1930 and, on March 2, 1931, the Helms Bakery opened with 32 employees and 11 specially-designed delivery coaches (trucks). By the next year, the Helms Bakery had become the “official baker” of the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Olympics when Paul Helms won a contract to supply bread for the 1932 games. Early Helms vehicles sported the Olympic symbol, and it also appeared on Helms bread wrappers.

Despite having never been sold in stores, Helms baked products soon became known to millions of consumers. The Helms motto was “Daily at Your Door” and every weekday morning, from both the Culver City facility and a second Helms Bakery site in Montebello, dozens of Helms panel trucks, painted in a unique two-tone yellow and blue scheme, would leave the bakery for the greater Los Angeles Basin, some going as far as 60 miles to the eastern San Gabriel Valley. This is remarkable because the network of freeways had not yet been built, so the trip would take an hour or more. Each truck would travel through its assigned neighborhoods, with the driver periodically pulling (twice) on a large handle which sounded a distinctive whistle, or stop at a house where a Helms sign was displayed. Customers would come out and wave the truck down, or sometimes chase the trucks on adjacent streets. Wooden drawers in the back of the truck were stocked with fresh donuts, cookies, pastries and candies, while the center section of the truck carried dozens of loaves of freshly-baked bread. Products often reached the buyers still warm from the oven.

I specifically remember climbing up into the cab and with extra wide-eyes watching the Helms man pull out the drawers marked fresh doughnut and brownies. All of Helms’ products had a distinctive taste, but the brownies were something of a comfort food that I can still taste and smell in my memory. They were a chewy, fudgy brownie loaded with black walnuts and iced with a rich type of butter cream frosting.

As more women entered the workplace, the freeways got more crowded and the bakery’s driver’s union wages became prohibitive. Alas, in 1969 the last Helms truck left the depot and the final whistle was blown as the company’s doors were closed for the last time.

Some of these fond memories were brought back when I was having a nostalgic conversation with one of my clients last week. She told me that her dad loved Helms’ brownies as much as I did and asked if perchance I happened to have a copy of the original recipe. As luck would have it, I did. You can find the Original Helms Bakery Brownies in our recipe section along with the Chocolate Butter Cream Icing. Now I feel like singing a couple of choruses of Memories.

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