Posts Tagged ‘Chocolate Milk’

The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Chip, Chocolate Milk Bundt Cake

Friday, May 30th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In my cookbook, Choclatique-150 Simply Elegant Desserts, I talked a little about my experiences at the old Adhor Dairies in Los Angeles, where they used to give us free chocolate milk in the reception area. On Fridays they would give us gallons to take home. I wasn’t a big chocolate milk drinker, but I did ‘invent’ a lot of kid recipes to use up the chocolate milk.

Since my partner Joan is a Wisconsin girl and her mom used to make a killer Milwaukee Milk Cake I came up with this simple quick chocolate milk cake recipe. It’s not too sweet and it has a great crisp outer texture, more than your usual cake, but it is still moist, rich and buttery on the inside. I always top it off with my chocolate milk glaze.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cool Time: 30 minutes
Bake Time: 40 to 45 minutes
Yield: Serves 8 to 10

Ingredients:
For the Cake:

2 3/4 cups all purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
3 large eggs
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 cup chocolate milk
2 sticks unsalted butter (softened)
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
8 ounces Choclatique Milk Chocolate Chips

For the Glaze:
2 to 3 tablespoons chocolate milk
1/4 teaspoon fresh orange zest
1 tablespoon Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 cup confectioner’s sugar

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  2. In a mixing bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until light yellow. Add the vanilla extract, milk and eggs and combine well.
  3. Add the flour, cocoa powder and baking powder in 3 steps and mix until smooth.
  4. Fold in the chocolate chips.
  5. Bake in a greased Bundt pan for about 40 to 45 minutes or until a cake tester inserted into the cake comes away clean.
  6. Invert and cool in the pan on a wire rack for about 30 minutes before glazing. The cake should release cleanly from the pan as it cools.
  7. Mix confectioner’s sugar, orange zest and cocoa powder with the milk (use 1 tablespoon of milk first, add second or third if necessary) and drizzle over the cake with the tines of a fork when it has cooled.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Milk Pudding

Thursday, May 15th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

When I was a kid, I never liked to drink chocolate milk. In my cookbook, Choclatique-150 Simply Elegant Desserts, I talked a little about my experiences at the Adhor Farms in West Los Angeles, where they used to give out free chocolate milk in the reception area. Yes, there was a day when there actually was a dairy on the west side. On Fridays they would give us gallons to take home. I wasn’t a big chocolate milk drinker, but I did ‘invent’ a lot of kid recipes to use up the chocolate milk.

I love chocolate pudding, but it has to be the old-fashioned kind where the skin forms on the top—no overly-starched instant pudding for this guy. And you don’t need to take short cuts when it comes to making a great chocolate pudding. The hardest part of the recipe is to wait for it to chill.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Chill Time: 2 hours
Yield: Serves 8

Ingredients:
2 cups, plus 1/2 cup chocolate milk
1/3 cup cornstarch
2 tablespoons cold coffee
1 1/2 cups heavy cream
1 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. In medium bowl, whisk together 1/2 cup of the cold chocolate milk, cold coffee and cornstarch until smooth.
  2. In a saucepan, combine 2 cups of milk, heavy cream, sugar, cocoa powder and salt and bring just to a simmer.
  3. Add the cornstarch mixture and continue stirring until it returns to a simmer. It will begin to thicken as the mixture gets hotter.
  4. Remove it from the heat, add the vanilla extract, stir well and pour into ramekins or small bowls.

ChefSecret: I use the coffee to add richness and depth to the chocolate pudding flavor. It is a natural chocolate enhancer and I use it in cakes, pies and cookies when appropriate. Never add cornstarch directly to a hot liquid as it will clump and pearl leaving lumps of cornstarch that are very undesirable in what should be a smooth-as-silk chocolate pudding.

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5 Things You Didn’t Know About Chocolate

Thursday, June 21st, 2012

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

If you’re like most women, you’re totally smitten with chocolate. People have been obsessing over this comfort food for thousands of years (the Mayans considered cacao a cure-all and the Aztecs used it as money). And all that obsessing has yielded some pretty surprising studies–and findings. Here are five things you need to know about your favorite indulgence.

sprinter

1. It Can Boost Your Workout
Skip the expensive sports drinks and protein shakes. Research shows chocolate milk is just as effective a recovery aid.

A study published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism compared the effects of a recovery drink and chocolate milk on endurance athletes’ ability to recover after a series of bike sprints followed by an endurance ride the next day. They found that chocolate milk was just as effective at relieving muscle soreness after the sprints, and preparing the athletes to perform in the endurance test the next day. Better yet, everyone preferred the taste of chocolate milk.

pms

2. Your Period Doesn’t Make You Crave It
Half of American women experience chocolate cravings. Of those who do, about half crave it right around “that” time of the month.

And while it’s nice to have your menstrual cycle to blame when you find yourself noshing on half a package of chocolate chip cookies, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania found that menstrual hormones aren’t the culprit. They compared the cravings of pre- and post-menopausal women and didn’t find any change. They did, however, find a higher prevalence of cravings among women who suffer from PMS.

Why? Annmarie Kostyk, a chocolate expert who studied at the Professional School of Chocolate Arts, Ecole Chocolat, in Canada, says this has a lot to do with the psychology behind comfort foods. “Chocolate is sociologically considered a comfort food, and people crave comfort foods when they feel terrible,” she says.

time to wake up

3. It Won’t Wake You Up
It’s a common misconception that chocolate is packed with caffeine, says Kostyk. In reality, the amount of caffeine in chocolate is miniscule compared to what’s in your other daily pick-me-ups.

An ounce of dark chocolate contains about 20 milligrams of caffeine, while an ounce of milk chocolate contains about 5 milligrams–the same as an 8-ounce cup of decaf coffee. In comparison, a cup of coffee contains about 100 milligrams and a cup of tea contains about 50 milligrams of caffeine.

4. It Contains Flavonoids
Flavowhats? Flavonoids are a type of phytochemical, or plant chemical, that are found naturally in chocolate. Due to their unique chemical structures, flavonoids can exert antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cell-protective effects, says Giana Angelo, Ph.D., a research associate who specializes in micronutrient research at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. Consuming foods rich in flavonoids has also been associated with a reduced risk of heart disease.

To reap the benefits, stick to dark chocolate. The average commercial dark chocolate contains about 60 percent cocao and has been found to contain 536 milligrams of flavonoids per 1.4-ounce serving. Research has shown that as few as 80 milligrams of flavonoids a day can lower blood pressure.

theobromine

5. It’s Not All Bad for Your Teeth
How could a food that’s long been touted as a cavity-causer actually have teeth-protecting properties? It turns out that theobromine, an organic molecule that occurs naturally in cocoa, can help strengthen tooth enamel, according to research from Tulane University.

In fact, it takes 142 times less cocao extract to have about twice the protective benefits of fluoride, according to the American Dental Association. Unfortunately, theobromine isn’t too beneficial in chocolate bars, where the sugar and milk counteract the dental benefits. Enter Theodent, a fluoride-free mint toothpaste that packs a punch of theobromine.

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Is Chocolate Milk Good for Kids?

Thursday, October 27th, 2011

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Chocolate Milk KidThe politically correct food police are out once again taking shots at providing chocolate milk in school cafeterias. So the question is; how dangerous is chocolate milk for our kids?

School officials and nutrition experts across the country are debating over whether to continue providing chocolate milk to kids in school. Of course, I would have thought the decision regarding children drinking chocolate milk was best made by parents. So here we are again debating, to drink or not to drink? That’s the hot-button question of experts across the country.

Jamie OliverThe debate over whether chocolate milk should be served in school cafeterias started all over again when the Los Angeles Unified School District announced it would ban chocolate- and strawberry-flavored milk from its schools starting the summer of 2011. Superintendent John Deasy pushed for the ban after being blind-sided by celebrity food activist Jamie Oliver, who said that flavored milk has as much sugar as a candy bar.

Low-Fat Chocolate MilkFairfax County, Virginia schools reintroduced chocolate milk this year after they and the DC schools banned it last year. The new, reformulated chocolate milk is low-fat (as it was before) and now contains less sugar than previous versions (and the sugar is from sugar cane or beets instead of the more processed high-fructose corn syrup).

Chocolate BeverageThe chocolate milk controversy is bigger than just school board policy. Chocolate milk is higher in sugar and calories than non-flavored milk, but some kids simply refuse to drink plain milk. Dairy industry data noted that milk consumption in 58 schools dropped by an average of 35 percent when flavored milk was removed or limited.

To many kids the taste of milk is just not desirable. So are kids better off consuming a little extra sugar and calories in chocolate milk than not consuming any milk? After all milk is a vital source of calcium, vitamin D, and other vital nutrients.

Chocolate-Flavored vs. Regular Milk

Milk Nutritional FactsAll milk is loaded with nutrients. One cup of fortified low-fat milk contains around 100 calories and 13 grams of sugar (in the form of lactose, a sugar found naturally in milk) and about 300 milligrams of calcium (about 25 percent of kids’ daily need) as well as vitamin D, vitamin A, B vitamins, and minerals including potassium and phosphorus. Scared of Plain MilkThe same size serving of typical low-fat chocolate milk contains about 160 calories and 25 grams of sugar (the increased amount comes from added sugar), with comparable levels of vitamins and minerals.

If you’re having trouble getting your children to drink milk and you’re concerned about the extra sugar and calories I suggest you consider putting a little a chocolate peanut butter cup in your child’s glass.

Drinking ChocolateNothing goes better together than our award-winning dark Choclatique chocolate and lightly roasted Virginia Peanuts & Peanut Butter. That’s the inspiration for our delicious Peanut Butter Swirl Drinking Chocolate Mix. It is full bodied, creamy in texture with a rich, dark chocolate color. It‘s a chocolate beverage with an intense yet comforting peanut butter flavor with only 24 grams of sugar and loaded with over 13 grams of healthful protein. Use this mix as you would traditional hot chocolate. Top with light whipped cream and crushed peanuts for additional protein. For the ultimate in chilled chocolaty refreshment, combine Peanut Butter Swirl Drinking Chocolate Mix together with cold milk and ice, blend until frothy then sprinkle with cocoa powder and crushed peanuts! Yum!

Peanut Butter Swirl Drinking Chocolate Mix is made with crushed Choclatique chocolate, premium cocoa powder and low-fat peanut flour made from USA-grown peanuts. It is all natural—no preservatives or artificial colors or flavors. It is also Gluten-Free and is perfect for everyone all year ‘round.

Customers who like Choclatique’s Peanut Butter Swirl Drinking Chocolate Mix also like our Drinking Chocolate Mix Sampler. And it so easy to make… simply add 4 tablespoons of Hot Drinking Chocolate Mix to cold milk (whole, 2%, 1%, non-fat or soy); whisk and heat for a steamy cold-weather chocolate treat. Add a dollop of light whipped cream for a sinfully chocolaty indulgence.

For the ultimate in chilled chocolaty refreshment, combine Cinnamon Drinking Chocolate Mix together with cold milk and ice… blend until frothy and sprinkle with cocoa powder and cinnamon. Enjoy!

Choclatique by Ed EngoronIf you’re looking for more chocolate beverage recipes and learning more about chocolate, its affects on the human body and improving your (and your children’s) disposition, buy my new book—Choclatique—150 Simply Elegant Desserts. The recipes make luscious tasting desserts perfectly the first time and every time there after. It is a foolproof guide to making all of your favorite chocolate desserts and beverages.

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Chocolate Milk—The Better Energy Drink

Thursday, April 14th, 2011

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

2012 OlympicsThe Olympic Games have been tarnished with controversies over blood doping, steroids, performance improving drugs and supplements. Even athletes who have taken an over the counter cold medication have been disqualified for a medal.

Michael PhelpsWhat I learned when researching for my new book, Choclatique, that the American swimmer Michael Phelps, who won fourteen career Olympic gold medals—the most of any Olympian—figure it out. He played it safe by drinking chocolate milk between races in Beijing.

Chocolate MilkIn a recent study if was found that chocolate milk may be as good, or even better, than sports drinks at helping athletes recover from strenuous exercise. Chocolate milk has the optimal ratio of carbohydrates to protein, which helps refuel tired muscles. And let’s face it: it tastes much better than those sugary-sweet, expensive sports beverages.

So, say no to Monster and Red Bull, and yes to chocolate milk. That’s what two University of Connecticut researchers, studying the effects of different beverages on young people has concluded. Nancy Rodriguez, who researches the science of endurance sports, says chocolate milk has proved to be an effective post-workout drink for restoring muscle tone. The study, funded by the National Dairy Council and the National Fluid Milk Processor Promotion Board, was focused specifically on what chocolate milk can do for athletes.

So what does chocolate milk do that plain white milk doesn’t? Rodriguez says, “The chocolate adds a little more sugar, and hence carbohydrates. Carbs—that’s still the energy that helps the muscle do the work. But you want milk to rebuild the muscle.” Rodriguez cautions that the extra sugar isn’t optimal for everyone, but athletes can benefit from it.

RunnersFor the study, moderately trained male runners ran for 45 minutes at least five days a week for two weeks. Some drank chocolate milk while others drank a carb-only drink such as Gatorade or Powerade; each drink had the same number of calories. Breath and blood samples taken after the first and second weeks indicated that the chocolate milk drinkers had greater muscle rebuilding.

Most important, she said, is for athletes to realize that milk—whether plain or sweetened—is as good and often better than many of the significantly more expensive products sold at nutrition stores. Many of the products marketed to athletes for energy and endurance are just souped-up versions of old-fashioned milk. Despite the many claims of supplements, it’s hard to beat all-natural.

Milk also has bioactive compounds—things that we don’t really know, but probably provide some nutritional value. Likewise, chocolate has over 300 beneficial chemical compounds which appear to complement milk.

No Red BullAnd stay away from energy drinks like Red Bull, warns Yifrah Kaminer, a professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at University of Connecticut. He published an article in the journal Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America in July on the dangers of caffeine for young people.

Kaminer said that 30 percent of young people between ages 12 and 17 regularly consume large quantities of energy drinks. Some of the super-caffeinated drinks, like Spike Shooter and Wired x505 (a whopping 500 milligrams of caffeine), carry warning labels that the product isn’t recommended for anyone under 18.

“Energy drinks’ much-touted exotic ingredients—taurine and guarana—give the drinks mystical flavor and image,” Kaminer said. But it’s really caffeine and sugar that do all the heavy lifting. Caffeine levels in energy drinks can range from 80 milligrams in an 8.2-ounce can of Red Bull to 300 milligrams in an 8.4-ounce can of Spike Shooter. To compare, a small McDonald’s coffee has 100 milligrams, while a large Starbucks has 330 milligrams and a 12-ounce can of Coke has 34 milligrams.

Chocolate Milk Girl“The big difference between coffee and energy drinks,” Kaminer said, “is that young people are more apt to consume energy drinks. Also, they tend to drink many of them.”

So, stick with no or low fat milk—chocolate milk—for improved muscle tone, building and peak performance… and go for the gold!

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