Posts Tagged ‘Chocolate’

The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Blueberry Cobbler

Friday, June 26th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

This recipe works great with other cobbler fruit and is an excellent light dessert that isn’t too sweet! Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 40 minutes
Ready In: 1 hour
Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients:
Filling:

3 cups fresh blueberries
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/3 cup orange juice
1 teaspoon all-purpose flour

Topping:
2/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 egg (optional, see ChefSecret below)
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 cup Choclatique Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.
  2. In an 8 inch square baking dish, mix blueberries, 3 tablespoons sugar, orange juice and 1 teaspoon of flour; set aside.
  3. In a small bowl, thoroughly mix flour, baking powder and salt; set aside.
  4. In a medium bowl, cream butter and 1/2 cup sugar until light and fluffy.
  5. Beat in the egg and vanilla extract.
  6. Gradually add flour mixture, stirring just until ingredients are combined.
  7. Fold in the chocolate chips. Do not over-mix.
  8. Drop batter by rounded tablespoons over blueberry mixture; cover as much of filling as possible.
  9. Bake in preheated oven for 35 to 40 minutes, until topping is golden brown and filling is bubbling.

ChefSecret: To be perfectly honest with you, the first time I made this cobbler in the test kitchen I forgot to add the egg. I usually don’t make mistakes like this, but as we always say, “sometimes chocolate happens.” Well, the result was surprisingly delicious. The topping tasted like great chocolate chip cookies and was a perfect complement to the blueberries. Even more impressive was how crisp the topping remained the next day. So, I decided to offer a choice—egg or no egg. Adding an egg will produce a more traditional, softer cobbler topping.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s No Butter—Mo Better Brownies: My Ode To Healthy Desserts

Friday, February 20th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Bertha Honoré Palmer asked the chef at her husband’s hotel—Palmer House—to create a dessert for ladies attending the World’s Columbian Exposition to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the New World in 1492. This exposition came to be known as the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893.

She told the chef, it should be smaller than a piece of cake, still retaining cake-like characteristics and easily eaten from boxed lunches with fingers. These first brownies featured an apricot glaze and walnuts. These brownies are still being made at the hotel according to the original recipe which requires about a pound of sweet butter, a pound of chocolate and a pound of sugar. Not exactly your ‘diet’ brownie.

If you have the craving for chocolate sweets and are trying to watch your waistline, then the following recipe is perfect for you. My No Butter—Mo Better Brownies are sweetened with apple sauce and flavored with cocoa powder, making them a big chocolate-flavored treat with much fewer calories that even meets Weight Watchers® standards.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 25 minutes
Cooling Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 60 minutes
Yield: Makes 12 Brownies

Ingredients:
Low fat cooking spray
1/3 cup self-raising flour
3 tablespoons Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
2 large egg whites
3/4 cup granulated sugar
6 tablespoons unsweetened apple sauce
2 tablespoons sunflower oil
2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon chopped walnuts

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 350º F.
  2. Spray an 8-inch square non stick baking dish with the cooking spray.
  3. In a medium size bowl, combine the flour, cocoa powder and salt, stirring together to mix.
  4. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the egg, egg whites, sugar, apple sauce, oil and vanilla extract.
  5. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture, stirring until just blended. Take care not to over mix, or the brownies will not rise.
  6. Transfer the brownie mixture to the baking pan and sprinkle with the walnuts.
  7. Bake in the center of the oven until just set, about 25 minutes. A cake tester inserted in the center of the cake should come out clean.
  8. Cool in the baking dish for 15 minutes—cut into 12 rectangles.

ChefSecret: The apple sauce is the secret as it replaces the majority of both the butter and sugar; the cocoa powder replaces the chocolate.

Weight Watchers points per serving: 2

Weight Watchers points per recipe: 26.5

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The ChocolateDoctor Could Chocolate Be Better for Your Teeth Than Fluoride?

Friday, February 13th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I know many, if not all, of our US municipal water supplies are treated with fluoride. I remember having fluoride treatments in the dental office growing up—all this to prevent dental cavities. My dentist would put a little fluoride in a shot glass and carefully apply a light coating over each tooth with a Q-tip. Imagine my surprise when I read an article recently informing me that fluoride is a toxic industrial waste product that is a poison to your system even in small amounts.

One has to start to ask, are there not far better options for decreasing tooth decay than ingesting a harmful industrial pollutant or using a topical poison like fluoride? Chocolate to the rescue—new research suggests a chocolate extract would make a better alternative.

I don’t think moms and dads would have any trouble coaxing their little ones to brush two times a day with a chocolate toothpaste if it works better than fluoride. A recent study presented at the American Dental Association this year compared fluoride toothpaste to a new toothpaste containing the naturally-occurring cacao extract theobromine.

This test determined the theobromine toothpaste repaired and re-mineralized exposed dentin better than the fluoride. Exposed dentin is a leading cause of tooth hypersensitivity. The results showed that patients who brushed their teeth with the cacao-extract toothpaste twice a day for one week had 100 percent dental occlusion with their tooth dentin becoming re-mineralized or repaired.

According to a release: [PRNewswire October 31, 2013] “The comparison to toothpastes containing fluoride—one as much as 5,000 parts per million—validates what our research has shown all along: that Rennou (the cocoa extract)… is more effective and safer than fluoride.”

Past research has also shown that the chocolate ingredient theobromine works better than fluoride when treating lesions in artificial enamel. Remineralization occurred at a greater rate than when they were treated with fluoride. The study found that theobromine made teeth less vulnerable to bacterial acid erosion that could lead to cavities.

With potential alternatives like theobromine, which are not harmful when swallowed, it’s unfortunate that fluoride can still be found in a vast assortment of toothpastes, mouthwashes and professionally applied fluoride treatments.

The ChocolateDoctor suggests that using a tooth paste containing natural ingredients, like theobromine, appears to be more effective and safer than fluoride-containing toothpastes. Above all, don’t forget to practice good oral hygiene—brushing after meals and getting regular dental cleanings and check-ups, too.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Homemade Chocolate Ganache Blocks

Friday, January 30th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

This is sort of a “guys” recipe even if he is somewhat cooking-challenged but still wants to make something chocolaty for his favorite gal. It is a non-fussy truffle without all the scooping. It’s really just chop, melt and cook—anyone can do it. In fact, it’s even a blast to make with the kids. Don’t be afraid to use the dried chipotle pepper, it will enhance the chocolate with a warm glow, not a hot burn. You’ll find it is just the perfect combination of chocolate and orange with just a hint of warmth.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Chill Time: 35 minutes
Ready In: 50 minutes
Yield: 30 Truffle Blocks

Ingredients:
1/2 pound Choclatique Private Reserve Chocolate (64%), chopped
1/8 teaspoon ground dried chipotle pepper
1/8 teaspoon pinch salt
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon orange zest
3 tablespoons Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder

Directions:

  1. Place the chopped chocolate into a medium size bowl; add the chipotle pepper and salt.
  2. Heat the cream, vanilla extract and orange zest in a small saucepan over medium-low heat until it just comes to a boil.
  3. Pour the hot cream mixture over chocolate and let it stand for 2 or 3 minutes until the chocolate has melted.
  4. Using a clean dry spatula stir until the chocolate mixture is completely smooth.
  5. Pour chocolate mixture out onto a sheet of plastic wrap on a work surface. Pick up one edge of the plastic and roll the chocolate into a rough log shape. Refrigerate until firm; about 35 minutes.
  6. Place cocoa powder into a small bowl. Unwrap chocolate and cut in half crosswise; cut each half into halves lengthwise. Roughly cut candy into 1/2-inch square blocks.
  7. Gently toss the chocolate pieces into the cocoa to coat.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Gingerbread Cake

Friday, September 26th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is an attention-grabbing, wonderful holiday cake that you will want to make all year round. It is my favorite dark, moist, chewy and nicely-spiced ginger bread cake. Of course I’ve taken the liberty to add a measure of cocoa powder and chocolate to make it perfectly Choclatique-worthy. It can’t help being awesome, fragrant, and smelling a lot like Christmas. I give this cake 5 spicy “yums.”

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 40-45 minutes
Yield: Serves 10 to 12

Ingredients:
1 cup dark, blackstrap molasses
1 cup boiling water
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup vegetable oil
2 large eggs
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon powdered ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon mace
1/8 teaspoon sweet anise
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup Choclatique Ebony Dark Chocolate Pastilles

For the topping:
8 ounces heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions:

  • Preheat an oven to 350° F.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine the molasses and the boiling water and mix.
  • Add the sugar and vegetable oil and stir well. Let this mixture cool to lukewarm before adding the eggs to prevent them from cooking and mix well.
  • Add the flour, baking soda, spices and salt and mix until you have a smooth batter.
  • Fold in the white chocolate pastilles.
  • Pour the batter into a greased 9 x 13 pan and bake 30 to 40 minutes, until it is springy and pulling away from the sides of the pan or until a cake tester inserted in the middle comes out clean.
  • Serve with dollops of whipped cream.

For the topping:

  1. Place a large bowl with the beaters for your mixer in the freezer. Make sure the cream itself is thoroughly chilled as well.
  2. Sift the confectioner’s sugar into a bowl.
  3. Pour the cream into the frozen bowl and beat at high speed until it begins to thicken. Gradually add the confectioners’ sugar and beat until soft peaks form. Add the vanilla extract. Keep beating the cream for about 5 to 8 minutes, until the cream is whipped and stiff. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

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What’s Not To Love About Chocolate?

Friday, September 12th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In my book, Choclatique—150 Simply 150 Elegant Desserts, I compared chocolate to the food of the gods. Not only does chocolate make us feel good emotionally, according to a growing community of medical researchers and health professionals it also contributes positively to our physical well being.

As I have written before, eating chocolate improves physical health. A substantial amount of research shows that cocoa flavanols may help control blood pressure and improve cardiovascular health overall. Eating dark chocolate, low in sugar, may also help control blood sugar, and prevents the growth of 1caries which is the bacteria that causes dental cavities. And preliminary research suggests that cocoa flavanols may boost brain health and memory. Scientists aren’t sure how it happens, but surmise that cocoa flavanols may increase blood flow—and therefore oxygen—to the brain. Increasing blood to certain parts of the male anatomy also helps ones’ sex life. Chocolate may very well do for that part of the body what Viagra does, but for far less money.

It turns out that chocolate-lovers may even be more lovable and better lovers! A study published in 2012 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that people who love sweets are likely to be more “sweet.” This may be caused by a change in brain chemistry. The consumption of chocolate floods the brain with dopamine which lights up the reward center of the brain and lifts mood. You can actually see it on a MRI.

The five words that we’ve chosen to identify with chocolate at Choclatique are Passion, Joy, Delight, Desire and Seduction. Following on the latter, one of the most seductive qualities of good chocolate is that it melts precisely at human body temperature, which provides a sensual experience unlike any other food.

Yes, chocolate may truly be the food of the gods.

1 Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or a cavity, is an infection, bacterial in origin, that causes demineralization and destruction of the hard tissues of the teeth—enamel, dentin and cementum. It is a result of the production of acid by bacterial fermentation of food debris accumulated on the tooth surface. If demineralization exceeds saliva and other remineralization factors such as from calcium and fluoridated toothpastes, these once hard tissues progressively break down, producing dental caries or cavities. Today, caries remain one of the most common diseases throughout the world.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s The Supremes (Chocolate-Raspberry Bars)

Friday, August 1st, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Raspberries combined with our chocolate is one of my favorite, all-time Choclatique flavor thrills. Marry this with a little cream cheese on a crispy, buttery base and you will wind up singing like The Supremes. Okay, that may be a little exaggeration, but you definitely will love the thin layer of tart raspberry jam and the powered sugar crust. The melted chocolate finish is the perfect topping. This is the perfect end-of-meal treat for all occasions—breakfast, lunch and dinner—well at least lunch and dinner.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 15 to 17 minutes
Cooling Time: 2 hours
Yield: 12 bars

Ingredients:
1 cup all-purpose flour, sifted
2 tablespoons Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, sifted
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup seedless raspberry jam
3 ounces cream cheese, softened
2 tablespoons whole milk
1 cup Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate Chips
2 ounces Choclatique Private Reserve (64%) Chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoon unsalted butter

Directions:
For the base:

    1. Preheat the oven to 375º F.
    2. In a large bowl, whisk to combine the sifted flour, cocoa powder and powered sugar.
    3. Cut in the butter with a fork and mix well. Press mixture into a 9 inch square baking pan.
    4. Bake for 15 to 17 minutes until lightly brown.

For the filling:

    1. Spread jam evenly over baked crust.
    2. In a small bowl beat the cream cheese and milk until smooth.
    3. Melt the white chocolate chips in a microwave and add to mixture. Beat together until smooth.
    4. Drop the cream cheese mixture by tablespoons evenly over the jam. Using metal off-set specula, evenly spread mixture over base.
    5. Refrigerate for at least two hours before glazing and serving.

For the Glaze Topping:

    1. Melt the dark chocolate with butter over low heat (or in a microwave oven), stirring constantly.
    2. Spread over the white chocolate-cream cheese bar layer.
    3. Cool completely. Cut into 12 bars and store in the refrigerator.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate-Peanut Butter Fudge

Friday, June 27th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I love a good piece of fudge any time. It is a good thing to snack on when you need an energy boost. We thought about making Choclatique fudge, but decided it is so easy to make at home that we would just share one of our secret recipes with you. We’ve made it easy. There are just 5 ingredients, most of which you already have in your home pantry.

This fudge is seriously good. Best of all, it works every time. It is great to give as a hostess/host gift. Consider this a base recipe and feel free to mix things up a bit. You can change the chocolate and add different mix-ins or toppings to create a variety of flavors and textures. Last week we even swirled in 1/4 cup of Concord grape jelly. So, be creative; we leave it up to you.

Ingredients:
1 cup unsalted butter
1 cup creamy peanut butter
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
16 oz. confectioner’s sugar (about 3 ½ cups)
1 1/2 cups Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate Pastilles

Directions:

  1. Prepare an 8 x 8 baking dish lined with food film, parchment or wax paper and set aside.
  2. In a small saucepan, melt the butter and peanut butter. Remove from the heat and add the vanilla extract and confectioner’s sugar. Stir with a wooden spoon until just incorporated.
  3. Transfer the base mixture to a medium size bowl and whip it using an electric mixer for about 2 minutes.
  4. Transfer the base mixture into the prepared baking dish. Press it down with a spatula and smooth until level.
  5. Microwave the milk chocolate in a small bowl for 1 minute. Stir until melted, smooth and shiny (heat for an additional 30 seconds if needed). Pour melted chocolate over the fudge, and use a spatula to gently spread it.
  6. Let the fudge cool at room temperature for 4-5 hours before cutting into 1-inch pieces.

ChefSecrets: If you want a less sweet tasting fudge substitute Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate Pastilles for the milk chocolate pastilles for the topping. Cooling the fudge at room temperature for 4 to 5 hours will reduce the amount of crystallization that you can get with poorly prepared fudge. You can quickly set the fudge in the refrigerator for 30-60 minutes, but expect that it may crystallize and taste a bit gritty. You will see condensation if you try to serve it at room temperature after refrigerating. So, just try to allow enough time to cool it properly.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Venice Beach Pier Chocolate Saltwater Taffy

Friday, June 13th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

When Venice of America opened on July 4, 1905, Abbott Kinney had already dug several miles of canals to drain the marshes for his planned residential community. He built a 1,200-foot long pleasure pier with an auditorium, ship-style restaurant, dance hall, hot salt-water plunge and 3 blocks of arcaded businesses all in Venetian-style architecture.

Thousands of tourists arrived on the “Red Cars” of the Pacific Electric Railway from Los Angeles and Santa Monica, then rode the Venice miniature railroad and canal gondolas to tour the town. But the biggest attractions were Venice’s gently sloping beaches and the saltwater taffy emporium. This was the Roaring ‘20’s and for the amusement of the public, Kinney hired aviators to do aerial stunts over the beach and boat races in the Pacific surf. Venice was becoming famous for its canals, beaches and circus-like oceanfront walk; a pedestrian-only promenade that featured street performers, fortune-tellers, artists and vendors.

My uncle opened Herb’s Doughnut Factory & Coffee. It was known for the state-of-the-art conveyor fryer that plopped the raw batter into the hot oil and transported each steamy, yummy doughnut past the counter guests under a curved glass canopy as they enjoyed their 5¢ cup of coffee. Who could resist the temptation of one of these plump morning treats at only 3¢. As afternoon turned to evening, doughnuts and coffee sales declined and my uncle added saltwater taffy chews to his offerings. Here one could get a twenty-piece bag of authentic Venice Beach Pier Saltwater Taffy for only 7¢. This little spot became as famous as the saltwater taffy shops on the Atlantic City’s Boardwalk in New Jersey.

You’ll never sink your teeth into a piece of candy quite like old fashioned salt water taffy. Each bite will leave you wanting more with its unique, soft, non-sticky texture and its irresistible flavor. Here is the original recipe that made Herb’s Doughnut Factory & Coffee (and taffy emporium) a major attraction at The Venice of America.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Cool Time: 30 to 45 minutes
Ready In: 2 hours
Yield: Makes 120 pieces

Ingredients:
Cooking spray or oil
1/2 cup evaporated milk
2 tablespoons cold coffee
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 tablespoons cornstarch
1/2 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
3 cups light corn syrup
1/2 vanilla bean, split
1 teaspoon coarse sea salt
Wax twisting papers

Directions:

  1. Generously grease a baking sheet.
  2. In a 4-quart saucepan, combine the milk, coffee, sugar, cocoa powder and corn syrup.
  3. Scrape the vanilla seeds into the pan. Add the pod. Begin to bring to a boil over high heat, uncovered, then insert candy thermometer.
  4. Reduce heat to medium; cook, stirring frequently to avoid scorching, until mixture reaches 246º F (this is known as the firm ball stage), 10 to 15 minutes.
  5. Remove pan from heat and pour on baking sheet.
  6. Remove vanilla bean pod with tongs. Sprinkle the salt evenly over the surface of the taffy. Cool until warm to the touch, 30 to 45 minutes.
  7. Turn the cooled taffy onto a large oiled cutting board. Stretch the taffy out with both hands, fold it over on itself and stretch again. Repeat this continuously until the taffy has turned opaque and white, about 15 minutes. This step is called pulling taffy.
  8. Generously grease the blades of a kitchen scissors and your hands. Pull the taffy into 4 equal pieces. Roll the first into an 24-inch robe. Snip off 1-1/2-inch pieces; immediately roll them in wax paper, so they hold their shape. Repeat with remaining taffy.
  9. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 weeks.

ChefSecret: Be very careful when working with hot sugar confections as they can cause terrible burns. Saltwater Taffy and hard candies will not set properly on a humid or moist day.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Basic Chocolate Ganache

Friday, May 9th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I wrote a whole book (Choclatique—150 Simply Elegant Desserts) about cooking and baking with ganache. A ganache is basically a blending of chocolate and cream. The ratio of chocolate to cream can vary depending on whether it will be a coating, filling or truffle.

In this recipe I use an industry standard 1-to-1 ratio of chocolate to cream. This is perfect for a beautiful shinny glaze on a cake or pie. It is firm, but not hard. When chilled and firm it can be whipped an electric mixer and use as a filling for pastry or roll into truffles. Of course you can add flavors, extracts and liquors to your taste.

Ingredients:
1/2 cup Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate (64%) Pastilles
1/2 cup Choclatique Ebony Dark Chocolate (72%) Pastilles
1/2 to 1 cup heavy cream (depending on intended use)
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened
1 teaspoon instant espresso granules
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon of other flavors, extracts and liquors of your choice (optional)

Directions:

  1. Place chocolate in a medium heatproof bowl.
  2. In a medium sauce pan heat the heavy cream, butter and espresso granules; bring to a simmer.
  3. Pour the hot cream mixture over the chocolate and whisk until the chocolate is melted, glossy and fluid. If desired whisk in additional heavy cream to reach the desired consistency.

ChefSecrets: To use the ganache as a candy coating or decorative outer shell on Petit Fours, reduce the amount of cream in recipe and keep ganache over simmering water or wrap the bowl in a heating pad. Add a little it more cream and whip with an electric mixer to get a frosting-like consistency great for decorating cakes and cupcakes (Do not refrigerate). To make old-fashioned rolled truffles scoop and hand roll room temperature ganache into a ball then roll in chopped nuts, confectioner’s sugar, decoratifs or Choclatique Unsweetened black Onyx Cocoa Powder.

Cake pops are really the popular rage at the moment and are in the forefront of chocolate fashion. They’re easy to make using leftover cake trimmings. Combine the trimmings with warm ganache—add a tablespoon at a time—mix until the cake and ganache are moist and fully combined. Add only as much ganache as needed to hold the mixture together. Roll mixture into balls and place on a waxed-paper lined sheet, insert a loll stick into the center of each ball (found at hobby stores). Place in freezer for about 2 hours and then dip in warm ganache to coat.

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