Posts Tagged ‘Candy Bars’

The ChocolateDoctor’s Bumpy, Rocky Road

Friday, August 8th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In 1950, a Russian Immigrant, Sam Altshuler started the The Annabelle Candy Company in San Francisco. The company was named after Sam’s daughter. It’s like I have always believed, all great trends start in California and Rocky Road was no exception.

The company currently makes 10 different candy bars. Rocky Road, the original marshmallow, chocolate, and cashews bar currently ranks among the top 35 best selling chocolate bars on the West Coast. Annabelle also makes Big Hunk, Look, U-NO and Abba-Zaba candy bars—all my favorites.

This recipe is my take on Sam’s famous, original Rocky Road bar. It’s easy to prepare and makes for wonderful food gifts for Christmas or Easter. If you don’t want to go to the trouble of making it, you can find an Annabelle Rocky Road bar in a candy aisle near you.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Cool Time: 2 hours
Yield: 10 Bars

Ingredients:
8 ounces Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate
2 1/2 ounces Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate
3/4 ounce unsalted butter
1 3/4 ounces mixed mini marshmallows
1 3/4 ounces butter shortbread cookies, chopped into mini marshmallow size sized pieces
3 1/2 ounces salted cashews nuts
3/4 ounce dried cherries

Directions:

  1. Line a 3 x 10-inch loaf pan with plastic food wrap.
  2. Place the milk and dark chocolates with the butter in a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water (don’t let the bowl touch the water); then stir until melted.
  3. Stir marshmallows, cashews and dried cherries into chocolate.
  4. Spread into pan, chill in fridge for 2 hours or until hard. Remove from the pan by lifting the edges of the plastic food wrap.
  5. Slice into 1-inch wide bars on a clean dry cutting board.

ChefSecret: You can replace the cashews with roasted and salted macadamia nuts or blanched, roasted and salted almonds. Any crisp cookie can be used in place of the butter shortbread.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Almost, But Not Quite A Baby Ruth® Candy Bar

Friday, September 6th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

It was in the late ‘60’s. Jim Jordon and I hopped on to a United Airlines plane—first class no less—and headed off to Chicago. Jim was a famous commercial director and I was the house art director at Cascade Pictures. We were going to meet with the president of the Curtiss Candy Company about designing and producing their first television commercial for Baby Ruth Candy. I had my sketches and story boards all packed up and Jim had his smile and wit. The meeting went well and we were hired. When we left, we were both given a gift box of Curtiss Candy products (Baby Ruth, Oh Henry, Butterfingers). I was never bashful about eating candy bars of any kind (still not), and a Baby Ruth was no exception. I loved the flavor combination of real chocolate, nougat and peanuts. The following recipe is a very good imitation of a great American tradition—Baby Ruth.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Ready In: 30 minutes
Yield: About 18 bars

Ingredients:
1 cup peanut butter (I like Skippy)
1 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
6 cups corn flakes cereal (or you can also use crispy puffed rice)
1 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
1 cup salted Virginia peanuts
2 cups of Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate Pastilles, melted

Directions:

  1. Butter a 9 x 13-inch baking dish.
  2. In a large saucepan over medium heat, combine the peanut butter, corn syrup, brown sugar and white sugar. Cook, stirring occasionally, until smooth. Remove from heat and quickly mix in the corn flakes, chocolate chips and peanuts until evenly coated.
  3. Press the entire mixture gently into the prepared baking dish. Allow to cool completely before cutting into bars.
  4. Melt the milk chocolate chips in a double boiler or in a microwave oven.
  5. Roll the bars into individual round logs and dip them into the melted milk chocolate to enrobe.
  6. Place them on waxed paper to let them set-up. Eat immediately or twist-wrap them in wax paper to savor later on.

The Baby Ruth Back Story: Do you know how the Baby Ruth got its name? Although the name of the candy bar sounds a lot like the name of the famous baseball player, Babe Ruth, the Curtiss Candy Company claimed it was named after President Grover Cleveland’s daughter, Ruth. The candy maker named the bar “Baby Ruth” in 1921, as Babe Ruth’s fame was on the rise, over 30 years after President Cleveland had left the White House. The company did not negotiate an endorsement deal with the Babe. Was the story true or was it a devious way to avoid having to pay the Babe any royalties? Or, was it actually named after the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Williamson, the candy makers who actually developed and sold the original formula to Curtiss Candy in 1921?

Note: Baby Ruth is a registered trademark of NestleUSA.

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