Posts Tagged ‘Brownies’

The ChocolateDoctor’s Brownie Biscotti

Friday, September 5th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is a fun recipe when you can’t make up your mind if you want a rich fudgy brownie or a crisp, Italian-style cookie. In this recipe you get the best of both—the luscious chocolate taste of a homemade brownie combined with the delightful crunch of biscotti. These are the perfect café cookie, made for dunking in coffee or hot chocolate.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 20 to 25 minutes
Cool Time: 30 minutes
Second Bake Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 24 pieces

Ingredients:
1/3 cup unsalted butter, softened
2/3 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder or Rouge Cocoa Powder
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
1/4 cup lightly roasted pecans, chopped

1 large egg yolk, beaten
1 tablespoon cold water

Directions:>/b>

  1. Preheat the oven to 375° F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment or waxed paper.
  3. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until smooth.
  4. Beat in the vanilla and eggs, one at a time.
  5. In a separate bowl, sift the flour, cocoa powder and baking powder.
  6. Using an electric mixer blend the creamed mixture on low until well blended.
  7. The dough will be stiff and sticky.
  8. Using a large spoon stir in the chocolate chips and nuts.
  9. Divide the dough into two equal parts and place on prepared baking sheet.
  10. Shape each into 9 x 2 x 1-inch logs 4 inches apart.
  11. Beat the egg yolk and water together ad brush the loaves lightly with the mixture.
  12. Bake for 20-25 minutes, until firm.
  13. Remove the loaves from the pan and cool for 30 minutes.
  14. Using a serrated knife, slice the loaves diagonally into 1-inch slices.
  15. Return the slices to the baking sheet, placing them on their sides.
  16. Reduce heat to 350° and bake for 10 minutes on each side or until dry. Cool completely and store in an airtight container.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s White Chocolate Chip Lemon Brownies

Friday, August 30th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Our customers love our Snowy White Chocolate! In fact, more customers purchase our 10-pound blocks of white chocolate than blocks of Dark or Milk Chocolate which is counter to most consumer trends. No kidding, there are days when we send out hundreds of pounds of Snowy White Chocolate. We wanted to find out why, so we inserted a questionnaire in every box of Snowy White that we shipped to see what recipes customers were making. I thought it would be fun to share some of the best of the best recipes that were sent.

If you love yummy, tart lemon bars then this recipe is one you’re going to want to make immediately. It is more or less a traditional lemon bar with the addition of Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate and White Chocolate Chips. Please use fresh lemon juice and zest—it makes a big difference.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 25 to 27 minutes
Cool Time: 30 minutes
Yield: 12 bars

Ingredients:
For the brownie:

2 tablespoons lemon zest, freshly grated
3 tablespoons lemon juice, freshly squeezed
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened (plus a little more for the pan)
1/3 cup Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate, melted
2 large eggs
1/4 cup Choclatique White Chocolate Chips

For the tart lemon glaze:
1 rounded cup powdered sugar
8 teaspoons lemon zest
4 tablespoon lemon juice

Directions:

    1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Butter and flour an 8 x 8-inch baking pan, shaking out the excess flour and set aside.
    3. Zest and juice the two lemons and set aside.
    4. In the bowl of an electric mixture fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the flour, sugar, salt and softened butter until combined.
    5. Add the melted white chocolate and continue to mix.
    6. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, lemon zest, and lemon juice until combined.
    7. Pour the egg mixture into the flour mixture and beat for 2 minutes at medium speed until smooth and creamy.
    8. Fold in the white chocolate chips.
    9. Pour into baking dish and bake for 25-27 minutes, you should start to see the edges turn a light golden brown. Do not overbake, or the bars will be too dry.
    10. Allow to cool completely before glazing.
    11. Sift the powdered sugar and whisk with lemon zest and juice.
    12. Spread half the glaze over the brownies with a rubber spatula and let the glaze set for about 10 minutes.
    13. Spread the other half of the glaze over the bars, and let it set (it will not harden like most lemon glaze bars).
    14. Cut into bars and serve.

ChefSecret: Lightly coat the chocolate chips with a dusting of all-purpose flour before folding in to the batter. This will prevent the chocolate chips for settling to the bottom of the bar while baking.

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The Chocolate Doctor’s Black & White Brownies

Friday, July 5th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Black & White Brownies are either a cheese cake-brownie or a brownie-cheesecake. It is rich, chocolaty and absolutely delicious. It is not difficult to make, but very easy to eat. An unknown chef (so many inventive chefs never get credit for their work) at Chicago’s Palmer House Hotel created this dessert after Bertha Palmer requested a dessert for her lady friends. They had all planned on attending the fair. It should be, she said, smaller than a piece of cake, though still retaining cake-like characteristics and easily eaten from boxed lunches. These first brownies featured an apricot glaze with walnuts, and they are still being made at the hotel according to the original brownie recipe. Brownies went on to be rated third in the top 10 snacks just a few years after they were invented.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Bake Time: 35 to 40 minutes
Ready In: 50 minutes
Yield: 12 Brownies

Ingredients:
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup coffee flavored liqueur
1 pound cream cheese, softened
1 large egg
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
1/4 cup vodka

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 325º F.
  2. Butter and flour a 9 x 9-inch baking pan tapping out the excess flour.
  3. In a medium bowl, cream together 1 1/4 cups of sugar and 4 tablespoons of butter. Add 2 eggs and mix well.
  4. Stir in 1/2 cup of the coffee liqueur.
  5. In a separate bowl, whisk together 1 cup of flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt. Stir into the butter mixture until well blended. Evenly spread half of this mixture into the prepared baking pan.
  6. In another bowl, stir together the 1/4 cup of flour and 1/4 cup of sugar. Add the softened cream cheese and mix well.
  7. Stir in 1 egg, 2 tablespoons butter, and the vodka. Mix until smooth. Spread this evenly over the chocolate layer mixture.
  8. Pour the remaining chocolate mixture over the top of the cream cheese mixture spreading with an off-set spatula. You can make a fancy pattern of stripes or swirls with a fork or knife.
  9. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes in the preheated oven.
  10. When brownies are cool, brush with the remaining 1/4 cup of coffee liqueur.

ChefSecret: If you don’t have any vodka on hand you can substitute with 7-Up or another lemon-line soda.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Death by Chocolate Brownie

Friday, March 1st, 2013

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

At my waterfront Custom House Restaurants in Northern California we had the most luscious, chocolaty dessert that you would ever desire—Chocolate Sludge. It was a heated chocolate chip brownie topped with a scoop of homemade, dark chocolate ice cream, covered with hot fudge and crowned with chocolate whipped cream.

When writing my book, Choclatique, my head chocolatier and I remade this restaurant favorite. As it turned out, we kept going back to the brownie pan to cut little samples for ourselves. Wow, we discovered that this brownie needed nothing more than to be served naked—no ice cream, no frosting or no nothing other than just right out of the pan.

Death By Chocolate BrowniePrep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 45 minutes
Cooling Time: 1 hour
Ready In: 2 hours
Yield: 16 extra rich brownies

Ingredients:
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1/4 cup cold water
2/3 cup unsalted butter
2 cups Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
4 large eggs
2 cups Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips (yes, more chocolate chips)
1 cup coarsely chopped roasted walnuts, pecans or even whole pistachios (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 325º F.
  2. Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a small bowl; whisk and set aside.
  3. Butter and flour a 9 x 9-inch baking dish.
  4. Combine the sugar, water and butter in a saucepan. Cook and stir over medium heat until the butter has melted and the sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat and stir in 2 cups of the chocolate chips and the vanilla extract until the chocolate has melted.
  5. Pour the mixture into a mixing bowl, and beat in the eggs one at a time until very smooth.
  6. Fold in the flour mixture until incorporated.
  7. Fold in the remaining bag of chocolate chips along with the nuts (if using).
  8. Pour into prepared pan and bake for about 45 to 55 minutes until the top is dry and the edges have started to pull away from the sides of the pan.
  9. Cool completely before cutting into squares to serve.

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The Actual “Inventor” Will Never Be Known

Friday, July 20th, 2012
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

The brownie was born right here in the U.S. of A. and remains one of America’s favorite baked desserts. Where did it come from? We aren’t sure where, although evidence points to New England in the first few years of the 20th century. Cake-like and baked in a cake pan, the brownie is classified as a bar cookie rather than a cake. There are thousands of recipes, both “cakey” and “fudgy” types. They’re all delicious.

As with many foods, the origin of the brownie is shrouded in myth, even though it is a relatively recent entry to the food pantheon, first appearing in print in the early 20th century. The legend is told variously: a baker mistakenly added cocoa to a batch of biscuits…a baker was making a cake but didn’t have enough flour… a housewife in Bangor, Maine was making a chocolate cake but forgot to add baking powder. When her cake didn’t rise properly, she cut and served the flat pieces. Alas, the actual “inventor” will most likely never be known and given credit for this American classic.

Choclatique’s Easiest, Richest, Darkest Chocolate Brownies

(No Frosting Necessary)

Yield 16 bars

Ingredients:
1/3 cup butter, cut into pieces
2 tablespoons water
1 cup granulated sugar
1 2/3 cups Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup chopped, toasted pecans (optional)

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325º F.
  2. Grease an 8-inch-square baking pan. Set aside 1/3 cup of the morsels.
  3. Mix together the butter, water and sugar, bring to a boil and remove from het. Add the chips and stir until melted. Pour into a medium bowl.
  4. Stir in eggs, one at a time; whisk until blended. Stir in vanilla extract.
  5. Add flour and salt; stir well.
  6. Stir in remaining 1/3 cup morsels and nuts.
  7. Pour into prepared baking pan.
  8. Bake for 38 to 40 minutes or until wooden pick inserted in center comes out slightly sticky.
  9. Cool in pan on wire rack. Cut into bars.

Choclatique Double Dark Chocolate Brownie MixChefSecret: For a richer, more complex flavor and nutty texture add 1/2 cup of Choclatique Roasted Cocoa Nibs when adding the pecans. Experiment by adding different nuts to your brownies—my favorites are roasted cashews and walnuts.

If you don’t have time to weigh and measure, then try our better than homemade Choclatique Double Dark Chocolate Brownie Mix which is made with Crushed Dark Chocolate. In about 20 minutes you can be enjoying my secret recipe of Choclatique’s delicious warm, out-of-the-oven brownies.

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Helms Bakery

Monday, February 21st, 2011
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In 1926, Paul Helms of New York took an early retirement and moved his family to Southern California and its mild climate. Helms started construction on a building between Washington and Venice Boulevards in 1930 and, on March 2, 1931, the Helms Bakery opened with 32 employees and 11 specially-designed delivery coaches (trucks). By the next year, the Helms Bakery had become the “official baker” of the 1932 Los Angeles Summer Olympics when Paul Helms won a contract to supply bread for the 1932 games. Early Helms vehicles sported the Olympic symbol, and it also appeared on Helms bread wrappers.

Despite having never been sold in stores, Helms baked products soon became known to millions of consumers. The Helms motto was “Daily at Your Door” and every weekday morning, from both the Culver City facility and a second Helms Bakery site in Montebello, dozens of Helms panel trucks, painted in a unique two-tone yellow and blue scheme, would leave the bakery for the greater Los Angeles Basin, some going as far as 60 miles to the eastern San Gabriel Valley. This is remarkable because the network of freeways had not yet been built, so the trip would take an hour or more. Each truck would travel through its assigned neighborhoods, with the driver periodically pulling (twice) on a large handle which sounded a distinctive whistle, or stop at a house where a Helms sign was displayed. Customers would come out and wave the truck down, or sometimes chase the trucks on adjacent streets. Wooden drawers in the back of the truck were stocked with fresh donuts, cookies, pastries and candies, while the center section of the truck carried dozens of loaves of freshly-baked bread. Products often reached the buyers still warm from the oven.

I specifically remember climbing up into the cab and with extra wide-eyes watching the Helms man pull out the drawers marked fresh doughnut and brownies. All of Helms’ products had a distinctive taste, but the brownies were something of a comfort food that I can still taste and smell in my memory. They were a chewy, fudgy brownie loaded with black walnuts and iced with a rich type of butter cream frosting.

As more women entered the workplace, the freeways got more crowded and the bakery’s driver’s union wages became prohibitive. Alas, in 1969 the last Helms truck left the depot and the final whistle was blown as the company’s doors were closed for the last time.

Some of these fond memories were brought back when I was having a nostalgic conversation with one of my clients last week. She told me that her dad loved Helms’ brownies as much as I did and asked if perchance I happened to have a copy of the original recipe. As luck would have it, I did. You can find the Original Helms Bakery Brownies in our recipe section along with the Chocolate Butter Cream Icing. Now I feel like singing a couple of choruses of Memories.

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