Archive for the ‘People’ Category

Happy New Year!

Friday, January 3rd, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Welcome 2014! Let me begin by wishing you all a very HAPPY NEW YEAR! Thanks to all of our loyal friends and co-workers who made 2013 a great year for Choclatique.

So many of our customers continue to come back to support us by giving Choclatique Chocolate to their friends and families and spreading the good word to many new customers who had never previously heard of Choclatique.

Our best selling assortments this season were Caramels, Nut and Nougats, one of our original collections, and Chic Cupcakes, one of our latest collections. We keep getting asked if these are really cupcakes. They are so beautifully designed and decorated that when you see a picture of them it’s hard to believe that they are truffles. Our website Build-A-Box feature sets us apart from the rest and is always popular… you can shop online and choose from over 150 flavors to build an 8-, 15- or 30-piece box.

Dave, our logistics manager, did a great job keeping all the orders straight, making sure all of those special messages were correctly written and most importantly, put in the right box before they were finally packed up to go. Dave also monitors the weather to make sure if a package is scheduled to go to a warmer climate it is properly insulated and protected with cold packs.

All of our heart-of-the-house co-workers in the Chocolate Studio did a terrific job this season and all year ‘round. Our chocolate continues to win awards and is on the WSJ Top Ten list. Sebastian has taken over the management of the Chocolate Studio and scurries from 8am until 5pm daily making sure that every single order is logged, correctly pulled and sent out promptly at 5PM nightly on the UPS truck. Special thanks to Chef Jonathan, Sebastian and his team of artisans and decorators—Mary Jo, Victor, Hugo, Karen, and Lydia—you make our chocolate so magically beautiful.

All of us realize that we’re not just selling chocolate, but memories. What would Aunt Betty think if she didn’t get her favorite box of chocolate for Christmas? Arriving a day late just wouldn’t do. It was a bit challenging this year with all of the snow storms in the mid-west and on the east coast, but UPS did all they could to deliver on time.

As we enter 2014 we also celebrate Choclatique’s tenth anniversary. To all of you who have been reading and commenting on this blog—thanks for making 2013 a great year for Choclatique. It’s been quite a ride.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Almost, But Not Quite A Baby Ruth® Candy Bar

Friday, September 6th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

It was in the late ‘60’s. Jim Jordon and I hopped on to a United Airlines plane—first class no less—and headed off to Chicago. Jim was a famous commercial director and I was the house art director at Cascade Pictures. We were going to meet with the president of the Curtiss Candy Company about designing and producing their first television commercial for Baby Ruth Candy. I had my sketches and story boards all packed up and Jim had his smile and wit. The meeting went well and we were hired. When we left, we were both given a gift box of Curtiss Candy products (Baby Ruth, Oh Henry, Butterfingers). I was never bashful about eating candy bars of any kind (still not), and a Baby Ruth was no exception. I loved the flavor combination of real chocolate, nougat and peanuts. The following recipe is a very good imitation of a great American tradition—Baby Ruth.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Ready In: 30 minutes
Yield: About 18 bars

Ingredients:
1 cup peanut butter (I like Skippy)
1 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
6 cups corn flakes cereal (or you can also use crispy puffed rice)
1 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
1 cup salted Virginia peanuts
2 cups of Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate Pastilles, melted

Directions:

  1. Butter a 9 x 13-inch baking dish.
  2. In a large saucepan over medium heat, combine the peanut butter, corn syrup, brown sugar and white sugar. Cook, stirring occasionally, until smooth. Remove from heat and quickly mix in the corn flakes, chocolate chips and peanuts until evenly coated.
  3. Press the entire mixture gently into the prepared baking dish. Allow to cool completely before cutting into bars.
  4. Melt the milk chocolate chips in a double boiler or in a microwave oven.
  5. Roll the bars into individual round logs and dip them into the melted milk chocolate to enrobe.
  6. Place them on waxed paper to let them set-up. Eat immediately or twist-wrap them in wax paper to savor later on.

The Baby Ruth Back Story: Do you know how the Baby Ruth got its name? Although the name of the candy bar sounds a lot like the name of the famous baseball player, Babe Ruth, the Curtiss Candy Company claimed it was named after President Grover Cleveland’s daughter, Ruth. The candy maker named the bar “Baby Ruth” in 1921, as Babe Ruth’s fame was on the rise, over 30 years after President Cleveland had left the White House. The company did not negotiate an endorsement deal with the Babe. Was the story true or was it a devious way to avoid having to pay the Babe any royalties? Or, was it actually named after the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Williamson, the candy makers who actually developed and sold the original formula to Curtiss Candy in 1921?

Note: Baby Ruth is a registered trademark of NestleUSA.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Tracking Down the Source of Chocolate: Equatorial Guinea

Friday, August 9th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I have had four careers in the last 45 years….a producer for ABC-TV covering the war in Vietnam, an art director and director in the film industry, a restaurateur with over 350 establishments and the co-founder of Choclatique. I’ve shot great action films and been shot at. I have directed famous and popular movie stars and have been credited with producing one of the top ten worst movies in history. I’ve opened restaurants that have been spectacular successes and one which was a spectacular failure. The most fun I have had has been the development of the brand and the fantastic products we make at Choclatique.

Last month I spent several weeks in Equatorial Guinea which, up until the mid twentieth century, was a large exporter of cocoa beans. I was in search of discovering great chocolate on the Dark Continent (If you prepare the recipe for Sofitel’s Cold, Welcoming Chocolate Beverage you will see and taste exactly what I mean about great chocolate). The Spanish brought a cocoa culture to Spanish Guinea, now known as Equatorial Guinea, West Africa in the late 1700’s.

Equatorial Guinea is on the west coast of equatorial Africa, bordered by Cameroon to the north and Gabon to the south and east. Malabo, the capital, is exactly 3 degrees north of the equator (I proved this out with my trusty iPhone compass and GPS system). It has the perfect climate and just the right amount of rainfall to grow great cacao, the fruit from which chocolate is made. A tiny country, it is slightly smaller than the state of Maryland. This includes the mainland (Río Muni), as well as three coastal islets (Corisco, Elobey Grande, and Elobey Chico) and two islands (Bioko and Annobóon). The larger of these is Bioko, formerly known as Fernando Po which is 25 miles off the coast of Cameroon. Mangrove swamps lie along the coast of the island. Río Muni is mainly tropical rain forest and is home to a variety of animals, including gorillas, snakes, chimpanzees, monkeys, leopards, elephants, and crocodiles.

Bioko was most important because of its cocoa plantations and proved to be one of Spain’s most profitable territories in Africa. When the Spanish Civil War ended in 1939, the Spanish began to invest more in the development of Equatorial Guinea. The country experienced increasing prosperity with the aid of the Spanish government and the Catholic Church. Industry grew, and cocoa and timber contributed to a strong economy.

Independence was declared in 1968. With the departure of Spain the country was left in dire straits. Many of the plantations were deserted and reclaimed by the rain forest. Today the country is rebuilding and establishing a great degree of political and economic stability. With the discovery of oil and other valuable natural resources their efforts are noticeable. On Bioko, the majority of the population lives in the City of Malabo, which is Equatorial Guinea’s capital. The city is clean, and its older architecture exhibits Spanish influence while the new buildings resemble the skyline of a major American city. There are new roads being built and construction cranes throughout the city showcase the efforts of Turkish and Chinese contractors.

The main foods are cassava root, bananas, rice, papaya, mango and yams. People also hunt and fish for protein. Palm wine and malamba (an alcoholic drink made from sugarcane) are both mild and popular.

Before independence, Equatorial Guinea’s primary source of income was from Spanish-grown cocoa production. With their departure, production fell significantly leaving plantations to be reclaimed by the jungle. Over the last couple of weeks I hiked into the jungle to find these old plantations and see for myself what remained of these vast growing areas. I was pleasantly surprised to see many old heirloom plants had survived the neglect and lack of attended cultivation. The cacao I found is most likely Forastero or Criollo (only testing will tell for sure). I estimate that the trees are probably about 200 years old and may very will be derived from the ancient cacao plants that would have been found in ancient Aztec civilizations and shipped to the colony.

Like superb wine and premium olive oils, fine chocolates all carry a signature flavor. Their distinctive flavors start with the original ingredient… the cacao bean. Wine grapes vary by varietal, region of origin, harvesting methods and weather. So, too, do cacao beans with the additional complications caused by the remoteness of the growing area and the fermenting and drying environment. Sophisticated connoisseurs of chocolate claim they can identify the country of origin, cacao tree type and processing methods; and can detect whether a chocolate comprises beans from a single estate (“terroir”) or blends. I’m pretty good at tasting, but not that good.

Before the mapping of the cacao genus a couple of years ago it was thought that there were only three varieties of heirloom cacao: the Criollo, the Trinitario and the Forastero. This is now being rethought as testing is proving that there may be more varieties than originally thought. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) now has the technology to help identify and map the various plants around the world.

Grown mainly in Central America, the Criollo represents only 1% of world’s fine chocolate production. Some exceptionally rare Criollo is harvested only by dugout canoe deep in the Amazon rainforest. Its cacao is fine and sweet, with complex flavor notes. The Forastero, grown largely in West Africa and South America, comprises about 80 percent of world’s fine chocolate production and has a strong, bold taste. The Trinitario is a flavorful bean and contains qualities of both trees and is grown throughout the world, producing about five percent of world fine chocolate output.

The most exciting part of the venture which eclipsed most everything else was the national energy to make a better life for all of the people who live there. It is more than just the construction of new buildings and roads and the discovery of oil which pays for much of it. It is the people who were most giving and hospitable. With all that is going on in the world today it was great to be welcomed as an American and treated so well by everyone I met and worked with. I am looking forward to returning back later in the year.

Choclatique creates chocolate for connoisseurs and for people who just love great chocolate. Our award-winning truffles and bars demonstrate our attention to artistic presentation and flavor perfection. Every day, our chocolatiers craft each piece using the finest ingredients. We use our premium blends of dark, milk and white chocolate made from premium cacao beans from around the world. And we continually search for rare and emerging cacao plantations from which we can source. We use only the finest ingredients: fresh cream and butter; and the finest liqueurs, nuts, fruits and spices. The secret to our success is allowing the natural chocolate flavors to dominate our truffles. We don’t use artificial flavors or preservatives.

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Farewell, Huell

Monday, January 14th, 2013

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Huell Burnley Howser

(October 18, 1945 – January 7, 2013)

Huell HowserJoan and I worked with Huell Howser on the third hour of the Ken and Barkley Saturday Morning Show on KABC. This was soon after Huell arrived in Los Angeles. Hour three, considered the lifestyle segment, featured Huell who introduced us to places in our own backyard that many of us weren’t familiar with; Chuck Walsh reviewed the latest movies and Joan and I featured restaurants by bringing in food from the establishments being discussed. Somehow Ken Minyard held the whole thing together with his fun banter with Roger Barkley. It was a fast, fun-filled hour (pre-taped on Wednesday mornings) which hit the airwaves at 9am. Huell was the first one to notice that when we were plying them with mouthfuls of food, it made it possible for us to get a word in edgewise.

Around this time, Huell had just taped the first segments of California’s Gold, his travel show, based in Los Angeles at KCET for California PBS stations. The series was a video chronicle and celebration of the history, culture and people of California. This was to become a tradition on television for the next 20 years.

Huell was born in Gallatin, Tennessee. He received a Bachelors degree in history from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where he also served as student body president. After serving in the United States Marines and later on the staff of Senator Howard Baker, Huell began his television career at WSM-TV in Nashville with a series of “human interest” stories.

Huell worked in New York as the host of WCBS-TV’s “Real Life” show and then moved to Los Angeles in 1981 as a reporter for KCBS-TV and as weekend host on Entertainment Tonight. In 1985 he joined Los Angeles television station KCET, then a PBS affiliate.

Huell was always excited about everything. California’s Gold highlighted small towns, landmarks, events or places of interest throughout California which are not well known to the general public, with Huell conducting informal interviews with the locals. He also produced derived shows including California’s Golden Parks, California’s Water, Visiting… with Huell Howser, Our Neighborhoods, The Bench, Road Trip, California’s Golden Fairs, and various specials.

Huell was a generous man donating his entire videotaped collection of California’s Gold to Chapman University. He also donated his personal papers, and a large collection of books on California history to the university. The school established the Huell Howser Archive, which, when completed, will offer the public free access to the entire digitized collection of episodes of California’s Gold. He also gave his extensive art collection to the university and endowed the California’s Gold Scholarship Fund.

Huell Howser2The last time we met up with Huell he was standing behind the host stand at El Coyote restaurant on Beverly Boulevard speaking with one of the owners. I was there with my visiting London nephew and giving him my full attention when I heard Huell’s smooth, southern accented voice, “Mr. Engoron, will that be a table for four?” We laughed and talked for about an hour about his series, our futures and Huell wanted to know all about Choclatique. We promised to get together soon at the Chocolate Studio but Huell was not able to visit because of his progressing illness.

Huell Howser’s death made us very sad, but then we can just tune to an old episode of California’s Gold and see him still very much alive and feel happy when watching his show. Goodbye Huell—rest in peace.

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“Papa” See’s Passes

Friday, August 31st, 2012

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

See's CandiesWhile not actually a member of the original See’s family, Charles N. Huggins, the retired president and CEO of See’s Candies, might have been known as “Papa” See’s. He served as president and CEO of the California-based company from 1972 to 2005 and had been with the company for more than 55 years.

I grew up on See’s chocolate living in Southern California and, as a Cub Scout, had visited the factory on La Cienega Boulevard which turned out to be one of the inspirations that enticed me to start Choclatique.

See's Candies2See’s Candies was founded in 1921. They are known for their sparkling clean black and white shops where candies are packed to order. See’s has reputation for having quality chocolate and has been a great brand with which to compete.

Mr. Huggins died on August 19th at the age of 87. Our heartfelt condolences go to his family. Mr. Huggins is survived by his wife of 12 years, Donna; sons Peter and Charles; daughters Anne and Shelley; sister, Ruth Slack; and nine grandchildren.

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So Long, Dick Clark

Thursday, April 19th, 2012

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Let me take a moment to break away from our wonderful topics—CHOCOLATE and CHOCLATIQUE—and talk about the loss of a friend and one of the stalwarts of the entertainment and music industries.

Dick Clark 1I first met Dick Clark when I was hanging out at the old ABC Television Studios on Prospect and Talmage on the fringe of Hollywood. That was before the days of high security, pass codes and pictured identification cards. I was around so often that someone finally offered me a job in the art department and very soon thereafter became an art director. Art directors are those guys and gals who design the scenery and sets for television show and movies. I was only in my late teens, (lied about my age; pushing 17 up to 26), but thankfully I had enough talent to convince people I knew what I was doing.

American BandstandOne of the shows I was to work on was American Bandstand. It’s kind of funny looking back today; I was just about the same age as the dancers on the show. I got to know Mr. Clark as each week I tried to design something a little bit better which seemed to impress him. Now, this was no easy feat. In the mid-60’s the budget for a show like this was only in the hundreds and you had to really stretch a dollar to get any production values at all.

Sonny & CherThe one thing I did learn about Mr. Clark was that he was one of the kindest men on the lot. He always took the time to talk to everyone on the set. He was very protective of the young unpaid kids who danced on the show, and was always showcasing new talent. I was there on Stage A for the first TV appearance of Sonny and Cher (I Got You, Babe), Chubby (The Twist) Checkers and many others.

Dick Clark 2One afternoon our director, Hal Galley, became ill with food poisoning (no, I didn’t do it). There were no other directors on the lot. Mr. Clark came over to me and asked if I would fill in for Hal. At the moment, this was the opportunity of a lifetime. Mr. Clark took me aside to assure me that I had been in the control booth long enough that he was sure I could handle a 30-minute show. Let the truth be known we had such a well-oiled group of professionals who had worked on the show for several years that no one could have failed at the task.

Control BoothMy first words were, “Cue the music!” and as I heard that famous theme score start, I began calling the shots. What a thrill to be asked by Dick Clark himself to fill in as a director. At the commercial breaks, Mr. Clark rushed up the stairs to compliment me on a job well done. I finished out the week for Hal and then went back to my normal duties of designing sets for Day in Court, Queen for a Day and Shivaree.

Dick Clark 3Several years later I got a call from Dick who asked me to draw some sketches for a new sitcom he was pitching. It was to be a comedy based on the life of a cave man that started out with a brute hitting his wife with a club and dragging her back to the cave. This was to be a kind of non-animated (totally polically incorrect) take-off on the Flintstones. Thankfully, nothing ever came of it.

Dick Clark 4I left the entertainment industry to open the first of many restaurants and later Choclatique. Over the years, Dick would be a guest at one of them. He always remembered me as “the kid” he gave the first shot to direct and I will always remember him as one of the the most generous gentlemen in Hollywood. So long, Dick, and rest in peace.

Dick Clark, R.I.P.
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Meet Karen Centeno

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

One of the people who make a difference at Choclatique

Karen is our senior chocolatier. She’s been with Choclatique from the very beginning and worked on the creation during the very long research and development years when we first got started. She started as an assistant, but soon showed she had much more artistic talent than she even realized. I remember we were working in the lab when she showed me how she would decorate one of our beautiful confections. It was so beautiful I was surprised to hear that she had never worked with chocolate before and had never done much in the way of conventional art work.

Christmas Crunch BrittleWhen working at Choclatique, every piece has to be a miniature masterpiece. Decorating a molded piece of Choclatique chocolate starts by paint molds with the desired design inside-out and up-side down. It takes a steady hand and a lot of patience. When you look at the detail, you have to admire how much goes into just a single piece of chocolate. Karen is responsible for chocolate production and training all of our decorators.

Chocolate EuphoriaOne of the things that I particularly love about Karen is her up-beat personality and wicked sense of humor. She comes to work every day with a big smile on her face. She keeps everyone laughing in the Chocolate Studio every single day no matter how busy we are. I think it may be the euphoria she feels when she eats our chocolate.

Karen played an important part in testing the recipes in Choclatique—150 Simply Elegant Desserts. If you’re interested in learning more about chocolate, its affects on the human body and improving your disposition, buy Choclatique—150 Simply Elegant Desserts. It is a great holiday gift and most importantly, the recipes make luscious tasting desserts perfectly the first time and every time thereafter. It is a foolproof guide to making all of your favorite desserts and improving your sweet disposition and those all around you.

CHOCLATIQUE by Ed Engoron ––––––––––––––– Full-Color Throughout 256 pages • 8 x 10 $27.00 /$31.50 CAN /£14.99 UK ISBN 978-0-7624-3964-5 • Available now on the Choclatique Website and in Book Stores

CHOCLATIQUE by Ed Engoron
Full-Color Throughout 256 pages • 8 x 10 $27.00 /$31.50 CAN /£14.99 UK ISBN 978-0-7624-3964-5 • hc Available on the Choclatique Website and Book Stores, September, 2011

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Michael Pollan Is A Putz

Thursday, November 10th, 2011

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Now he says, “High-Fructose Corn Syrup Is Not Necessarily Worse Than Sugar.”

Michael PollanIn the past, when Michael Pollan talked about the food industry, people listened. You might know him as the author of In Defense of Food. Pollan used to wield a lot of influence among those who care about mindful eating, both in terms of health and sustainability, but as with all food terrorists he so exaggerated his unscientific and repeated condemnation of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as particularly harmful has he lost his creditability. He had done great harm to the sweetener’s reputation over the past few years with his damaging remarks.

But now Pollan is changing his public stance on HFCS. He was asked about the dangers of HFCS in a recent interview with the Cleveland Plain-Dealer, and he flip-flopped on his past opinion.

High-Fructose Corn Syrup“I’ve done a lot to demonize it (HFCS),” he says. “And people took away the message that there was something intrinsically wrong with it. A lot of research says this isn’t the case. But there is a problem with how much total sugar we consume.” High-fructose corn syrup is cheaper than sugar, so it traditionally was pumped into a lot of foods, including savory items.

“It shows the brilliance of the industry, which is always a couple of steps ahead of me,” Pollan says. “They started giving products made of real sugar health claims and [are] trying to make sugar look good.” And that is a problem.

In the same interview, he cites both the demonization of high-fructose corn syrup and the craze for gluten-free products as examples of the faddishness of nutritional thinking.

As with all of these self-proclaimed experts, this guy doesn’t know which end is up. Both sugar and corn products are natural and sustainable and are easily grown right here in the United States keeping a lot of our farmers in business. Quite frankly, I think Pollan just likes to hear the sound of his own voice and the cash register ring when he sells his over-priced books.

Now, at Choclatique we don’t use a lot of corn syrups. We probably use as much rice syrup as the alternative. We do use Hawaiian-grown cane sugar as we like the taste and the functionality of what it does for our confections. I don’t own stock in Archer-Daniels-Midland, the largest provider of corn syrups. I don’t work for them nor consult with them so I have no ax to grind unless it’s with people of influence who, quite frankly, don’t really know what the hell they’re talking about.

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Meet Dave Rubinstein

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

One of the people who make a difference at Choclatique

DaveDave makes sure that Choclatique chocolate looks as great when you get it as it did when it left the Chocolate Studio. Sometimes that can be hundreds of boxes a day to keep track of. He keeps his steady hand on the pulse of the shipping department to make sure we never disappoint anyone. After all, we are doing more than just selling chocolate, we are providing memories. Dave knows we can never be late delivering a birthday, anniversary or Valentine’s Day box of chocolate.

As an avid record collector and deejay, one of Dave’s other interests is music. He’s also something of a pop culture historian by virtue of the fact that he spent much of his formative years watching television and films. These days, he plans on spending more time hiking and trying to work off some of the extra calories he’s taken on as one of Choclatique’s taste testers (all in the name of Quality Assurance, of course).

Choclatique by Ed EngoronDave was one of our proofreaders for Choclatique—150 Simply Elegant Desserts. I don’t know how many times he read the manuscript, but I’m sure he must have been dreaming about recipes for weeks. If you’re interested in learning more about chocolate, its affects on the human body and improving your disposition, buy Choclatique—150 Simply Elegant Desserts. It is a great holiday gift and most importantly, the recipes make luscious tasting desserts perfectly the first time and every time thereafter. It is a foolproof guide to making all of your favorite desserts and improving your sweet disposition and those all around you.

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Think Different

Monday, October 10th, 2011

Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Caramel Apple

Steven Paul Jobs (born February 24, 1955) was an American business magnate and inventor. He was the co-founder and chief executive officer of Apple Inc. Jobs previously served as chief executive of Pixar Animation Studios. He became a member of the board of The Walt Disney Company in 2006, following the acquisition of Pixar by Disney. He was credited in the 1995 movie Toy Story as an executive producer. Jobs believed in being the best.

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