Archive for the ‘Chocolate’ Category

The ChocolateDoctor’s Frozen Chocolate Eggnog

Friday, December 13th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I really love this time of year in California where many people go to the beach on Christmas day. Yes, Christmas weather in Los Angeles can be in the 80’s. Eat you heart out Minneapolis!

This is beverage sort of like an eggnog Frappuccino—Eggnogaccino. It is made in a blender with my Basic Eggnog recipe  or even with the store-bought stuff you find around the holidays. It can be made with or without alcohol. It’s indulgent, great tasting, quick to make and loaded with chocolate flavor.

Prep Time: 5 Minutes
Yield: Makes one 16 ounce serving

Ingredients:
1 cup prepared eggnog (store-bought)
1 cup of ice
5 tablespoons Choclatique Dark Chocolate Drinking Mix
2 tablespoons chocolate liqueur, crème de cacao or light rum
2 ounces whipped cream, the aerosol can will do
1 teaspoon Choclatique Dark Chocolate Curls

Directions:

  1. Using a blender combine the prepared eggnog, ice, Dark Chocolate Drinking Mix and chocolate liqueur.
  2. Blend until smooth.
  3. Top of the frozen eggnog with whipped cream and garnish with chocolate curls over top.
  4. Serve immediately.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Frozen Hot Chocolate Margarita

Friday, December 6th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Friday after 6 is happy hour time at Choclatique. That’s when our team goes out to celebrate the end of the work week and see how we can make it even better on Monday. Last Friday we decided to stay a little later and get some more things off our do lists.

We had some Choclatique Dark Drinking Chocolate left in the dispenser and a bottle of tequila nearby and decided to see if we could make them work together. We started with the tequila—a good tequila is slightly spicy with vanilla back notes—which goes well with chocolate. All we had left to do was add in the coffee-flavored Kahlua, fresh milk and orange liqueur and blend—this drink is crazy good. It’s a delicious way to finish the week with great co-workers and friends with adult chocolate fun.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Blend Time: 40-45 seconds
Serves: 12 to 16

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon chocolate syrup
1 tablespoon Choclatique Chocolate Decoratifs
1 1/2 cups ice, crushed
1/2 cup whole milk, very cold
1/2 cup Choclatique Dark Drinking Chocolate mix
1 1/2 oz. tequila
1 oz. Kahlua
1/2 oz. Grand Marnier

Directions:

  1. In one small bowl, add sprinkles. In another, add the chocolate syrup.
  2. In a blender, combine the rest of the ice, milk, drinking chocolate mix, tequila, Kahula and Grand Marnier.
  3. Blend in until combined and frothy.
  4. Dip the rims of chilled glasses into the syrup first, then the sprinkles. Pour the blended drink into the glasses and serve.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Angel Food Cake

Wednesday, November 27th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Angel Food Cake is made with a large quantity of egg whites (usually the whites from about 11 to 13 eggs) without any shortening or leavening. Angel Food cake is thought to be a takeoff of a sponge cake or a Pennsylvania Dutch wedding cake. Indications are with the abundance of cake molds found in southeastern Pennsylvania, the angel food cake originated there in the early 1800s.

That said, some suspect the origins of Angel Food cake are very mysterious, all the more so since they seem to derive from the mysterious East. The theory is that a family who lived along the Atlantic Coast moved to a quiet place along the Hudson River and opened a boarding house. A friend presented one of the ladies of the family, who was remarkably skilled as a cake-baker, a recipe that had come to her from a friend in India. Sometime later, cake-baker of the family opened a bakery specializing in cakes, including the mysterious one from the East.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 60 minutes
Cooling Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 1 1/2 hours
Yield: Serves 8 to 10

Ingredients:
2 cups egg whites
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/4 teaspoons cream of tartar
1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
1 1/4 cups confectioners’ sugar
1 1/4 cups cake flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, sifted
1 1/4 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 325º F.
  2. In a medium bowl, mix together the confectioners’ sugar, cake flour and cocoa. Sift together 3 times, and set aside.
  3. In a clean large bowl, whip the egg whites, salt and cream of tartar with an electric mixer on high speed until very stiff. Fold in white sugar 2 tablespoons at a time while continuing to mix. Fold in flour mixture, a little at a time, until fully incorporated. Stir in vanilla. Pour into a 10 inch tube pan.
  4. Run a knife or spatula around the perimeter of the pan and through the batter one time to reduce any air pockets formed when filling the pan.
  5. Bake for about 1 hour, or until cake springs back when lightly touched.
  6. Remove from the tube pan and let cool completely.
  7. To serve, paint a plate with a little chocolate sauce and drizzle a little chocolate sauce over the top.

ChefSecret: Cream of tartar or potassium bitartrate (also known as potassium hydrogen tartrate) crystallizes in wine casks during the fermentation of grape juice, and can precipitate out of wine in bottles. The crystals (wine diamonds) will often form on the underside of a cork in wine-filled bottles that have been stored at temperatures below 10 °C (50 °F), and will seldom, if ever, dissolve naturally into the wine. In its ground powder form it is the perfect stabilizer for egg whites and whipped cream.

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Stressed

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

It’s nearly the end of the year… just a few short weeks from Christmas and you haven’t even started shopping. You just got a cancellation notice on your health insurance and your expected year-end commission has been cut in half. Are you feeling stressed?

Stress is a normal part of life, but we also need to find ways to relieve it. Two squares of dark chocolate—Choclatique Elephant or Q-91 Chocolate—could be just the prescription the doctor ordered to change your attitude by lowering your stress hormone levels.

Why do I we get so wound up when feeling stressed? Going back to our caveman instincts, stress releases powerful neurochemicals and hormones in our brains that prepare us for action to either fight or flee. If we don’t take action, the stress response can create health problems. Prolonged, uninterrupted, unexpected, and unmanageable stress is very damaging to our bodies and minds.

As recently reported in the online issue of the Journal of Proteome Research, a group of Swiss researchers tracked volunteers that were highly stressed. In this study, strong evidence indicated that daily consumption of only 1.4 ounces of dark chocolate—low in sugar—during a period of two weeks was sufficient to modify the metabolism of the healthy human volunteers. The chocolate also appeared to help correct other imbalances in the body that are related to stress.

Now you may ask, won’t chocolate make people fat? That’s certainly possible, but scientists at the Nestle Research Center in Lausanne, Switzerland, point out other positive benefits… dark chocolate contains antioxidants, which are beneficial to health overall and other substances in chocolate appear to reduce the risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and high levels of cholesterol along with other medical conditions.

So take this as free advice from the doctor—The ChocolateDoctor… take two chocolate squares and call me in the morning. Here’s wishing you sweet dreams and stress-free chocolate wishes for the holidays!

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Old Fashioned Chocolate Ginger Cookies With White Cream Fondant Icing

Friday, November 15th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Ginger cookies are such a delight around the holidays and these chocolate-ginger cookies are no exception! Home-baked ginger cookies were the rage in the 1950s and are making a comeback right now. The richness of the chocolate and the vibrancy of the exotic spices are extraordinary. If you’ve never had a chocolate and ginger cookie combination, it will quickly become one of your favorites. In fact, people who don’t even like ginger love these soft, cakey cookies. The white cream fondant icing is the perfect topping for these cookies. Call me the Ginger Bread Man!

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Chill Time: 1 hour
Baking Time: 9 to 10 minutes
Cooling Time: 10 minutes
Ready in: 1 hour 30 minutes
Yield: About 12 Cookies

Ingredients:
1/4 unsalted butter, softened
1/4 cup granulated sugar
1 large egg
1/2 cup black strap molasses
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 cup hot tap water
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

For the Cream Fondant Icing:
3/4 cup confectioner’s sugar
1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon whipping cream

Directions:
For the Cookies:

  1. Preheat the oven to 400º F.
  2. Prepare a baking sheet with parchment paper or very lightly grease the baking sheet.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, beat together the softened butter, sugar, egg, and molasses.
  4. Dissolve the baking soda in the hot water and add to the mixture.
  5. Add the flour, cocoa powder, salt, ginger, nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon and mix well.
  6. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap to chill the dough for at least one hour to let it rest.
  7. Drop 1/4 cup mounds of the chilled dough on the prepared baking sheet—spaced well apart to allow for spreading.
  8. Bake 7 to 8 minutes until they are set; when lightly touched with a finger almost no imprint remains. While they are still slightly warm, frost with Cream Fondant Icing.

For the Cream Fondant Icing:
Mix all the ingredients together and whip it until it is well blended.

ChefSecret: Remember, real butter makes the best cookies.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Dutch Baby Pancake

Friday, November 8th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

My first introduction to Dutch Baby pancakes was the cover of Sunset Magazine years ago. It was the pretty cover shot that caught my attention. Within a week it was on the brunch menu at my Palm Grill Restaurant in Burlingame, California. It looked as good coming out of the kitchen as it did on the Sunset cover. The problem was the time it took to bake and the amount of oven space that was available. We got so many orders that it became a bottleneck in the kitchen. So now it is reserved for special guests at home. Dutch Baby Pancakes are not only for breakfast or brunch but are great for dessert as well, especially with the addition of Choclatique Chocolate.

Chocolate Dutch Baby Pancakes combine the light, eggyness of a popover with the tenderness of a crêpe. There is a secret to making it perfect every time. It is the combination of the light, thin batter and a piping hot skillet. When these two forces are in motion you get a giant, puffy pastry that begs to climb out of the pan. To be served immediately.

Prep Time: 15 min
Bake Time: 25 min
Yield: 1 pancake / 4 servings

Ingredients:
3/4 cup whole milk, room temperature
3 large eggs, room temperature
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, sifted
1/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
1/4 cup granulated sugar
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
3 tablespoons powdered sugar, for dusting
Strawberries, Blackberries, Boysenberries or Choclatique Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips for serving, optional

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 425º F for about 20 minutes before you are going to bake. It has to be a very hot oven.
  2. In a blender, combine the milk, eggs, flour, cocoa powder, salt, cinnamon, vanilla extract, almond extract and granulated sugar. Blend until well combined, about 1 minute.
  3. In a large cast-iron skillet or a non stick sauté pan, (I used a medium size paella pan), melt the butter in the oven until it just about to brown.
  4. Working quickly, pour the batter into the very hot skillet and immediately transfer back to the oven.
  5. Bake until puffed and set, about 20 to 25 minutes. Remove from oven and dust with powdered sugar. Serve immediately with berries and or chocolate chips if desired.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Bread Pudding with Bourbon Pecan Sauce

Thursday, October 24th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Bread pudding is a bread-based dessert popular in many countries’ cuisines. In other languages, its name is a translation of “bread pudding” or even just “pudding,” for example “pudín” or “budín” in Spanish.

There is no fixed recipe, but it is usually made using stale or left-over bread, and some combination of ingredients like milk, eggs, sugar or syrup to make custard, along with dried fruit and spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, mace or vanilla. As you might expect, I prefer to add lots of Choclatique chocolate. The bread is soaked in the custard, mixed with the other ingredients and then baked.

It may be served with a sweet sauce of some sort, such as chocolate, whiskey, rum or caramel sauces, but is typically sprinkled with sugar and eaten warm in squares or slices. In Canada it is often made with maple syrup. In Malaysia, bread pudding is eaten with custard sauce. In Hong Kong, it is typically served with vanilla cream or ice cream.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 45 minutes
Ready In: 60 minutes
Yield: 12 servings

Ingredients:
For the Sauce:

1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup light corn syrup (Karo)
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 1/4 cups heavy whipping cream
1 cup chopped toasted pecans
2 tablespoons bourbon

For the Pudding:
2 cups whole milk
2 cups heavy whipping cream
1 cup granulated sugar
8 ounce Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate
8 large eggs
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 pound egg bread, sliced into 1 inch pieces

Directions:
To Make the Sauce:

  1. In a heavy large saucepan stir 1 1/4 cups sugar and water over medium heat until sugar dissolves.
  2. Mix in the corn syrup and lemon juice. Increase the heat and boil without stirring until syrup turns deep amber brushing down sides of the pan with wet pastry brush and swirling the pan occasionally.
  3. Remove from the heat and pour in 1 1/4 cups cream (Be Careful—The Mixture Will Bubble Up).
  4. Stir over low heat until the caramel is melted and smooth.
  5. Increase the heat and boil until the sauce is reduced to about 1 2/3 cups, stirring often, about 4 minutes.
  6. Remove from heat; mix in pecans and bourbon; set aside.

To Make the Pudding:

  1. Preheat oven to 350º F.
  2. Combine the milk, 2 cups of cream and 1 cup of sugar in a medium saucepan over medium high heat, stir until the sugar dissolves and the mixture comes to boil. Remove from heat, add the chocolate; stir until smooth. Let the mixture cool for about 5 minutes.
  3. In large bowl beat the eggs with the vanilla extract to blend. Gradually whisk in cooled chocolate mixture.
  4. Add the bread cubes and let them stand until bread absorbs some of the custard, stirring occasionally, about 60 minutes. Transfer mixture to a 13 x 9 x 2-inch glass baking dish. Cover with foil.
  5. Bake until set in center, about 45 minutes.
  6. Remove the foil to lightly brown the top; no more than 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool on a wire rack.
  7. Serve pudding warm or at room temperature with warm sauce.

ChefSecret: For the bread I like to use stale challah (Jewish egg bread), brioche (French egg bread) or even King’s Hawaiian Bread with the crusts removed. In a pinch you can use stale French bread also remembering to remove the crust. Using stale bread give the pudding a little more texture and bite.

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A Bitter Bar To Swallow

Friday, October 18th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here’s a bit of bitter, not better, news for chocolate enthusiasts. Due to higher world-wide demand for chocolate and bad weather in the cacao growing regions, the price of chocolate is expected to rise, especially for premium chocolate.

Rising demand in Asia along with bad weather for major cocoa crops in Ivory Coast, Ghana and Indonesia are driving costs up significantly. The price of cocoa butter, which is used to make chocolate, is at an all time high—up 80% in just the last 7 months.

The cost of making the average milk chocolate bar is up 25% in the past year; however retail prices have only risen by 7%, because the big chocolate makers want to avoid pricing consumers out of their cravings.

If you like higher-quality dark chocolate, you’ll probably see prices going up much more. If left to our politicians, who want to control everything, they might propose creating a Department of Chocolate and a chocolate welfare program to manage the “global chocolate crisis.”

If you want a unilateral solution, however, you might wait until Nov. 1 and then stuff your freezer full of Trick or Treat leftovers to tide you through the end of the year. After all, as I write this, we don’t even have a functioning government. Better yet, indulge early and often with the good stuff—Choclatique.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Cake Doughnuts

Friday, October 11th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Everyone loves doughnuts because there are so many wonderful flavors from which to choose. There are the warm raised, glazed doughnuts—the flavor that made Krispy Kreme famous—frosted vanilla, cherry, strawberry, maple and even flavors with sprinkles and decoratifs. You can buy a cruller, a cinnamon twist or even an apple fritter that is made with leftover scraps and pieces layered with canned apple pie filling. And then there’s iced chocolate cake doughnuts.

There is a famous doughnut shop nearby Los Angeles International Airport. This iconic landmark is located in the heart of Inglewood and has been featured in countless films, music videos, and even inspired the landscape of Springfield, where Homer Simpson and the gang call home. If you get there just as the doughnuts are just coming out of the fryer, they have a wonderful texture providing a great, crunch in every bite. That’s when these magic circles of fried dough are at their peak of perfection. I think you’ll find with my doughnut recipe you will get that special fresh-out-of-the-oil CRUNCH every time.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Rest Time: 15 minutes (the dough, not you)
Fry Time: 3 minutes
Ready In: 30 minutes
Yield: 12 Doughnuts and 12 Doughnut Holes

Ingredients:
1 3/4 cups + 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
2/3 cup granulated sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
3 tablespoons melted butter
1/3 cup Choclatique Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips
1/2 cup whole milk
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract
1 large egg, beaten
1 quart oil for frying
3 tablespoons of confectioner’s sugar
1 tablespoon Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, sift together 1-3/4 cups flour, cocoa powder, sugar, salt, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and cardamom.
  2. Cut in the butter and the mini chocolate chips until crumbly.
  3. Stir in the milk, extracts and egg until smooth.
  4. Lightly knead the dough in the bowl and then turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Roll to 1/4-inch thickness.
  5. Cut with a doughnut cutter, or use two round biscuit cutters of different sizes. Cover the dough with a damp kitchen towel for 15 minutes to allow the dough to rest.
  6. Heat the oil in deep-fryer or large pot to 375º F. Use a frying thermometer to make sure the temperature is correct.
  7. Carefully drop doughnuts and doughnut holes into hot oil, a few at a time. Flip them over after about 30 seconds to make sure they round on both sides.
  8. Fry for about 3 minutes, turning once more until both sides are golden brown.
    Do not overcrowd pan or oil may overflow causing a fire hazard.
  9. Drain on the fried doughnuts on paper towels.
  10. Combine confectioner’s sugar and cocoa powder together and then dust doughnuts with the mixture or frost with your favorite chocolate glaze.

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Cherry-Chocolate Fondue

Friday, October 4th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

We’ve all done it—dunked a piece of fruit, cake square or cookie into hot fudge or chocolate sauce—and loved it. The Swiss originally called Fondue Käss mit Wein zu kochen, but that’s a little long-winded for a national dish. Actually, the original fondue dishes were popularized with cheese being the key ingredient. Fondue’s origins stem from an area that covers Switzerland, France (Rhone Alps) and Italy (Piedmont and Aosta valley), but today fondue can be found throughout Europe.

After World War II, “fondue” has been generalized to other dishes in which a food is dipped into a communal pot of hot liquid. One such dish is chocolate fondue, in which pieces of fruit or cake are dipped into a melted chocolate mixture. You’ll find in this simple recipe the brandy gives it the fondue sparkle; the coffee gives depth and the cinnamon gives it definition. If you drop a piece of fruit or cake into the fondue pot you must kiss everyone of the opposite sex.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minute
Ready In: 15 minutes
Serves: 6 people

Ingredients:
4 tablespoon heavy cream
1 cup Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate Pastilles
1 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
2 tablespoons cherry brandy
1 tablespoon strong brewed coffee
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions:

  1. Heat the cream in a fondue pot over a low flame (or in a saucepan over low heat).
  2. Add the 2 types of chocolate chips, brandy, coffee and cinnamon.
  3. Heat until melted, stirring occasionally. Serve at once.

ChefSecret: This is the perfect fondue for dipping fresh fruit—apples, pears or pineapple during the fall and winter holiday season and stone fruit (peaches, apricots or nectarines), honeydew, cantaloupe during the spring and summer months.

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