Archive for the ‘Chocolate’ Category

The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Blueberry Cobbler

Friday, June 26th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

This recipe works great with other cobbler fruit and is an excellent light dessert that isn’t too sweet! Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 40 minutes
Ready In: 1 hour
Yield: 6 servings


3 cups fresh blueberries
3 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/3 cup orange juice
1 teaspoon all-purpose flour

2/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 egg (optional, see ChefSecret below)
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 cup Choclatique Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips


  1. Preheat oven to 375° F.
  2. In an 8 inch square baking dish, mix blueberries, 3 tablespoons sugar, orange juice and 1 teaspoon of flour; set aside.
  3. In a small bowl, thoroughly mix flour, baking powder and salt; set aside.
  4. In a medium bowl, cream butter and 1/2 cup sugar until light and fluffy.
  5. Beat in the egg and vanilla extract.
  6. Gradually add flour mixture, stirring just until ingredients are combined.
  7. Fold in the chocolate chips. Do not over-mix.
  8. Drop batter by rounded tablespoons over blueberry mixture; cover as much of filling as possible.
  9. Bake in preheated oven for 35 to 40 minutes, until topping is golden brown and filling is bubbling.

ChefSecret: To be perfectly honest with you, the first time I made this cobbler in the test kitchen I forgot to add the egg. I usually don’t make mistakes like this, but as we always say, “sometimes chocolate happens.” Well, the result was surprisingly delicious. The topping tasted like great chocolate chip cookies and was a perfect complement to the blueberries. Even more impressive was how crisp the topping remained the next day. So, I decided to offer a choice—egg or no egg. Adding an egg will produce a more traditional, softer cobbler topping.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Yummy Guinness Stout Brownies

Thursday, June 18th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

This is the first of my new series of blogs and chocolate recipes. I took a few months off to lose a little weight and recharge my creative batteries. If you’ve been one of our regulars, thanks for coming back. If you’re a newbie, welcome!

Last Friday I went to O’Brien’s in Santa Monica, my favorite Irish pub, where they were sampling the new Guinness Blonde American Lager. For me it was a complete disconnect as I love my beers dark and chewy. Joan, on the other hand, thought it was one of the best lagers she tasted.

On the way home I stopped and picked up a 6-pack of Guinness Stout (the original). I cook and bake with Guinness a lot. If you never had my Guinness Fire-House Chili you’ve never really had great chili (said with a fairly modest smile on my face). The secret ingredients to the chili are Guinness Stout, of course, and 2 tablespoons of Choclatique Rouge Cocoa Powder. But enough about chili; more to the point is dessert, Guinness and chocolate.

Below is one of the richest (and best) recipes for brownies made with Guinness Stout. The stout flavor really shines through when combined with Choclatique chocolate and cocoa powder. It’s kind of like a marriage made in heaven or in this case our Chocolate Studio (which is heaven on earth). I asked our lead chocolatier, Mary Jo, to make this recipe and prove it out. It was fun, simple to make and was gone in 60 seconds (just like the movie).

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 45 to 50 minutes
Yields: 9 to 12 servings (they are very rich)

1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Cocoa Powder
1/4 cup Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate
8 tablespoon unsalted butter
4 large eggs
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup brown sugar, packed
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract
1/2 cup Guinness Stout (drink what’s left while the brownies are baking)
1 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips


  1. Pre-heat an oven to 325°F.
  2. Spray and cocoa-flour a 9 x 9-inch glass baking pan.
  3. In a medium bowl sift together the flour, salt and cocoa powder.
  4. Melt the Choclatique Private Reserve Chocolate in a bowl in the microwave, or over boiling water.
  5. In a small pan, over medium heat, melt the butter until just golden brown. Pour the brown butter into small bowl. Scrape the pan to get the brown bits (that’s where the rich buttery flavor is).
  6. In the bowl of a stand mixer with paddle attachment, beat together the eggs and sugars until thick and shiny, about 2 to 3 minutes. Continue beating on low while alternately adding the sifted flour mixture and wet ingredients (butter, beer and melted chocolate), finishing with vanilla and almond extracts. Do not over mix.
  7. Fold in the chocolate chips.
  8. Pour into the prepared 9 x 9-inch pan Bake 45-50 minutes or until a cake tester comes out mostly clean.

ChefSecrets: There are 2 secrets; 1) Give the full amount of time to beating the eggs and sugars together. That’s what gives the brownie the lift as there is not leavening in the recipe. 2) To avoid white streaks use cocoa powder to flour the pan instead of all-purpose flour.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s No Butter—Mo Better Brownies: My Ode To Healthy Desserts

Friday, February 20th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Bertha Honoré Palmer asked the chef at her husband’s hotel—Palmer House—to create a dessert for ladies attending the World’s Columbian Exposition to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the New World in 1492. This exposition came to be known as the Chicago World’s Fair of 1893.

She told the chef, it should be smaller than a piece of cake, still retaining cake-like characteristics and easily eaten from boxed lunches with fingers. These first brownies featured an apricot glaze and walnuts. These brownies are still being made at the hotel according to the original recipe which requires about a pound of sweet butter, a pound of chocolate and a pound of sugar. Not exactly your ‘diet’ brownie.

If you have the craving for chocolate sweets and are trying to watch your waistline, then the following recipe is perfect for you. My No Butter—Mo Better Brownies are sweetened with apple sauce and flavored with cocoa powder, making them a big chocolate-flavored treat with much fewer calories that even meets Weight Watchers® standards.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 25 minutes
Cooling Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 60 minutes
Yield: Makes 12 Brownies

Low fat cooking spray
1/3 cup self-raising flour
3 tablespoons Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
2 large egg whites
3/4 cup granulated sugar
6 tablespoons unsweetened apple sauce
2 tablespoons sunflower oil
2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon chopped walnuts


  1. Preheat an oven to 350º F.
  2. Spray an 8-inch square non stick baking dish with the cooking spray.
  3. In a medium size bowl, combine the flour, cocoa powder and salt, stirring together to mix.
  4. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the egg, egg whites, sugar, apple sauce, oil and vanilla extract.
  5. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture, stirring until just blended. Take care not to over mix, or the brownies will not rise.
  6. Transfer the brownie mixture to the baking pan and sprinkle with the walnuts.
  7. Bake in the center of the oven until just set, about 25 minutes. A cake tester inserted in the center of the cake should come out clean.
  8. Cool in the baking dish for 15 minutes—cut into 12 rectangles.

ChefSecret: The apple sauce is the secret as it replaces the majority of both the butter and sugar; the cocoa powder replaces the chocolate.

Weight Watchers points per serving: 2

Weight Watchers points per recipe: 26.5

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The ChocolateDoctor Could Chocolate Be Better for Your Teeth Than Fluoride?

Friday, February 13th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I know many, if not all, of our US municipal water supplies are treated with fluoride. I remember having fluoride treatments in the dental office growing up—all this to prevent dental cavities. My dentist would put a little fluoride in a shot glass and carefully apply a light coating over each tooth with a Q-tip. Imagine my surprise when I read an article recently informing me that fluoride is a toxic industrial waste product that is a poison to your system even in small amounts.

One has to start to ask, are there not far better options for decreasing tooth decay than ingesting a harmful industrial pollutant or using a topical poison like fluoride? Chocolate to the rescue—new research suggests a chocolate extract would make a better alternative.

I don’t think moms and dads would have any trouble coaxing their little ones to brush two times a day with a chocolate toothpaste if it works better than fluoride. A recent study presented at the American Dental Association this year compared fluoride toothpaste to a new toothpaste containing the naturally-occurring cacao extract theobromine.

This test determined the theobromine toothpaste repaired and re-mineralized exposed dentin better than the fluoride. Exposed dentin is a leading cause of tooth hypersensitivity. The results showed that patients who brushed their teeth with the cacao-extract toothpaste twice a day for one week had 100 percent dental occlusion with their tooth dentin becoming re-mineralized or repaired.

According to a release: [PRNewswire October 31, 2013] “The comparison to toothpastes containing fluoride—one as much as 5,000 parts per million—validates what our research has shown all along: that Rennou (the cocoa extract)… is more effective and safer than fluoride.”

Past research has also shown that the chocolate ingredient theobromine works better than fluoride when treating lesions in artificial enamel. Remineralization occurred at a greater rate than when they were treated with fluoride. The study found that theobromine made teeth less vulnerable to bacterial acid erosion that could lead to cavities.

With potential alternatives like theobromine, which are not harmful when swallowed, it’s unfortunate that fluoride can still be found in a vast assortment of toothpastes, mouthwashes and professionally applied fluoride treatments.

The ChocolateDoctor suggests that using a tooth paste containing natural ingredients, like theobromine, appears to be more effective and safer than fluoride-containing toothpastes. Above all, don’t forget to practice good oral hygiene—brushing after meals and getting regular dental cleanings and check-ups, too.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Ice Cream Bread

Friday, February 6th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Two of my favorite things in life are really good bread and really great ice cream. I am especially partial to Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream. They were bought by one of the giant international food companies, but they have kept up the quality of the ice cream and the inventiveness of the flavors and are still spot on. During the end of last year I kept hearing things about this new, easy-to-make Ice Cream Bread, which is made with ice cream and self-rising flour.

At first I thought it was just a joke, but I kept on reading more and more about it. I started asking all the important questions. Does it need any yeast or baking powder to rise? Does it have to be just plain vanilla ice cream? Can I use any mix-ins? I decided to give it a try.

I had an unopened pint of B & J’s Cherry Garcia (cherry ice cream with cherries & fudge flakes) in the freezer. I quickly whipped up the batter and to my surprise, the bread actually turned out well! It was moist, yet fluffy. All of the ice cream flavors came through. And in future tests I discovered you shouldn’t use yeast or other leavening agents; you can use most flavors of ice cream and you can add mix-ins in moderation in addition to those already in the ice cream such as fruit, chocolate chips and even some Choclatique Cocoa Powder. This is one of the easiest, most rewarding, fool-proof recipes I’ve come across. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

1 pint ice cream—flavor of your choice
1 1/2 cups Self-Rising Flour
1/2 cup Choclatique Chocolate Chips (any complimentary chip flavor, dark, milk or white chocolate)


  1. Preheat an oven to 350º F.
  2. Spray a loaf pan with cooking spray.
  3. In the bowl of an electric mixer, mix the ice cream and flour until combined.
  4. Scoop batter into the loaf pan.
  5. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until it springs back to the touch.
  6. Let the bread cool on a rack, slice and enjoy!

ChefSecret: For best results use a premium grade of ice cream. I prefer Ben & Jerry’s but Häagen-Dazs also works well in this recipe. Non-premium ice cream brands have much more air whipped into them and don’t deliver enough structure or flavor. If you are adding cocoa powder, decrease the amount of flour by the amount of cocoa powder you add—for the best result use 1/4 cup of any Choclatique Cocoa Powder.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Homemade Chocolate Ganache Blocks

Friday, January 30th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

This is sort of a “guys” recipe even if he is somewhat cooking-challenged but still wants to make something chocolaty for his favorite gal. It is a non-fussy truffle without all the scooping. It’s really just chop, melt and cook—anyone can do it. In fact, it’s even a blast to make with the kids. Don’t be afraid to use the dried chipotle pepper, it will enhance the chocolate with a warm glow, not a hot burn. You’ll find it is just the perfect combination of chocolate and orange with just a hint of warmth.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Chill Time: 35 minutes
Ready In: 50 minutes
Yield: 30 Truffle Blocks

1/2 pound Choclatique Private Reserve Chocolate (64%), chopped
1/8 teaspoon ground dried chipotle pepper
1/8 teaspoon pinch salt
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon orange zest
3 tablespoons Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder


  1. Place the chopped chocolate into a medium size bowl; add the chipotle pepper and salt.
  2. Heat the cream, vanilla extract and orange zest in a small saucepan over medium-low heat until it just comes to a boil.
  3. Pour the hot cream mixture over chocolate and let it stand for 2 or 3 minutes until the chocolate has melted.
  4. Using a clean dry spatula stir until the chocolate mixture is completely smooth.
  5. Pour chocolate mixture out onto a sheet of plastic wrap on a work surface. Pick up one edge of the plastic and roll the chocolate into a rough log shape. Refrigerate until firm; about 35 minutes.
  6. Place cocoa powder into a small bowl. Unwrap chocolate and cut in half crosswise; cut each half into halves lengthwise. Roughly cut candy into 1/2-inch square blocks.
  7. Gently toss the chocolate pieces into the cocoa to coat.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Gingerbread Cake

Friday, September 26th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is an attention-grabbing, wonderful holiday cake that you will want to make all year round. It is my favorite dark, moist, chewy and nicely-spiced ginger bread cake. Of course I’ve taken the liberty to add a measure of cocoa powder and chocolate to make it perfectly Choclatique-worthy. It can’t help being awesome, fragrant, and smelling a lot like Christmas. I give this cake 5 spicy “yums.”

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 40-45 minutes
Yield: Serves 10 to 12

1 cup dark, blackstrap molasses
1 cup boiling water
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup vegetable oil
2 large eggs
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon powdered ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon mace
1/8 teaspoon sweet anise
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup Choclatique Ebony Dark Chocolate Pastilles

For the topping:
8 ounces heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract


  • Preheat an oven to 350° F.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine the molasses and the boiling water and mix.
  • Add the sugar and vegetable oil and stir well. Let this mixture cool to lukewarm before adding the eggs to prevent them from cooking and mix well.
  • Add the flour, baking soda, spices and salt and mix until you have a smooth batter.
  • Fold in the white chocolate pastilles.
  • Pour the batter into a greased 9 x 13 pan and bake 30 to 40 minutes, until it is springy and pulling away from the sides of the pan or until a cake tester inserted in the middle comes out clean.
  • Serve with dollops of whipped cream.

For the topping:

  1. Place a large bowl with the beaters for your mixer in the freezer. Make sure the cream itself is thoroughly chilled as well.
  2. Sift the confectioner’s sugar into a bowl.
  3. Pour the cream into the frozen bowl and beat at high speed until it begins to thicken. Gradually add the confectioners’ sugar and beat until soft peaks form. Add the vanilla extract. Keep beating the cream for about 5 to 8 minutes, until the cream is whipped and stiff. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Dark Chocolate-Cherry Fudge

Friday, September 19th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

The origin and history of fudge is unclear, but fudge is thought to be an American invention. Most believe the first batch was a result of an accidental botched or “fudged” batch of caramels where chocolate was accidentally added in, hence the name “fudge.” The first known sale of fudge was in 1886 in Baltimore and sold for 40 cents a pound. In 1888, a student asked for the fudge recipe, and made 30 pounds of fudge to sell at the Vassar Senior Auction. Fudge became the new fashion confection after word spread to other women’s colleges of the tasty confection. Later, Smith and Wellesley schools each developed their own recipe for fudge.

Prep Time: 8 minutes
Cook Time: 6 minutes
Total Time: 14 minutes
Yield: 48 pieces

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
2/3 cup evaporated Milk
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups miniature marshmallows
1 2/3 cups Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
3/4 cup dried cherries (or candied), coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract


  1. Line an 8-inch-square baking pan with foil.
  2. Combine the sugar, evaporated milk, butter and salt in medium, heavy-bottom saucepan. Bring to the mixture to a rolling boil over medium heat, stirring constantly.
  3. Boil, stirring the mixture constantly, for 4 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Stir in the marshmallows, chocolate chips, dried cherries and extracts.
  5. Using an electric mixer, vigorously blend for 2 minutes or until marshmallows are fully incorporated.
  6. Pour into the prepared baking pan.
  7. Refrigerate for about 2 hours until firm.
  8. Lift from the pan; remove foil. Cut into 48 equal pieces.

ChefSecret: For a delicious variation on this fudge recipe substitute the cherries with a dried berry blend, dried blueberries, apricots, candied pineapple, walnuts, almonds or pistachios.

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What’s Not To Love About Chocolate?

Friday, September 12th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In my book, Choclatique—150 Simply 150 Elegant Desserts, I compared chocolate to the food of the gods. Not only does chocolate make us feel good emotionally, according to a growing community of medical researchers and health professionals it also contributes positively to our physical well being.

As I have written before, eating chocolate improves physical health. A substantial amount of research shows that cocoa flavanols may help control blood pressure and improve cardiovascular health overall. Eating dark chocolate, low in sugar, may also help control blood sugar, and prevents the growth of 1caries which is the bacteria that causes dental cavities. And preliminary research suggests that cocoa flavanols may boost brain health and memory. Scientists aren’t sure how it happens, but surmise that cocoa flavanols may increase blood flow—and therefore oxygen—to the brain. Increasing blood to certain parts of the male anatomy also helps ones’ sex life. Chocolate may very well do for that part of the body what Viagra does, but for far less money.

It turns out that chocolate-lovers may even be more lovable and better lovers! A study published in 2012 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that people who love sweets are likely to be more “sweet.” This may be caused by a change in brain chemistry. The consumption of chocolate floods the brain with dopamine which lights up the reward center of the brain and lifts mood. You can actually see it on a MRI.

The five words that we’ve chosen to identify with chocolate at Choclatique are Passion, Joy, Delight, Desire and Seduction. Following on the latter, one of the most seductive qualities of good chocolate is that it melts precisely at human body temperature, which provides a sensual experience unlike any other food.

Yes, chocolate may truly be the food of the gods.

1 Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or a cavity, is an infection, bacterial in origin, that causes demineralization and destruction of the hard tissues of the teeth—enamel, dentin and cementum. It is a result of the production of acid by bacterial fermentation of food debris accumulated on the tooth surface. If demineralization exceeds saliva and other remineralization factors such as from calcium and fluoridated toothpastes, these once hard tissues progressively break down, producing dental caries or cavities. Today, caries remain one of the most common diseases throughout the world.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Brownie Biscotti

Friday, September 5th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is a fun recipe when you can’t make up your mind if you want a rich fudgy brownie or a crisp, Italian-style cookie. In this recipe you get the best of both—the luscious chocolate taste of a homemade brownie combined with the delightful crunch of biscotti. These are the perfect café cookie, made for dunking in coffee or hot chocolate.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 20 to 25 minutes
Cool Time: 30 minutes
Second Bake Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 24 pieces

1/3 cup unsalted butter, softened
2/3 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder or Rouge Cocoa Powder
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
1/4 cup lightly roasted pecans, chopped

1 large egg yolk, beaten
1 tablespoon cold water


  1. Preheat the oven to 375° F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment or waxed paper.
  3. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until smooth.
  4. Beat in the vanilla and eggs, one at a time.
  5. In a separate bowl, sift the flour, cocoa powder and baking powder.
  6. Using an electric mixer blend the creamed mixture on low until well blended.
  7. The dough will be stiff and sticky.
  8. Using a large spoon stir in the chocolate chips and nuts.
  9. Divide the dough into two equal parts and place on prepared baking sheet.
  10. Shape each into 9 x 2 x 1-inch logs 4 inches apart.
  11. Beat the egg yolk and water together ad brush the loaves lightly with the mixture.
  12. Bake for 20-25 minutes, until firm.
  13. Remove the loaves from the pan and cool for 30 minutes.
  14. Using a serrated knife, slice the loaves diagonally into 1-inch slices.
  15. Return the slices to the baking sheet, placing them on their sides.
  16. Reduce heat to 350° and bake for 10 minutes on each side or until dry. Cool completely and store in an airtight container.

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