Archive for the ‘Chocolate’ Category

The ChocolateDoctor’s Dark Chocolate-Cherry Fudge

Friday, September 19th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

The origin and history of fudge is unclear, but fudge is thought to be an American invention. Most believe the first batch was a result of an accidental botched or “fudged” batch of caramels where chocolate was accidentally added in, hence the name “fudge.” The first known sale of fudge was in 1886 in Baltimore and sold for 40 cents a pound. In 1888, a student asked for the fudge recipe, and made 30 pounds of fudge to sell at the Vassar Senior Auction. Fudge became the new fashion confection after word spread to other women’s colleges of the tasty confection. Later, Smith and Wellesley schools each developed their own recipe for fudge.

Prep Time: 8 minutes
Cook Time: 6 minutes
Total Time: 14 minutes
Yield: 48 pieces

Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
2/3 cup evaporated Milk
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups miniature marshmallows
1 2/3 cups Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
3/4 cup dried cherries (or candied), coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract

Directions:

  1. Line an 8-inch-square baking pan with foil.
  2. Combine the sugar, evaporated milk, butter and salt in medium, heavy-bottom saucepan. Bring to the mixture to a rolling boil over medium heat, stirring constantly.
  3. Boil, stirring the mixture constantly, for 4 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Stir in the marshmallows, chocolate chips, dried cherries and extracts.
  5. Using an electric mixer, vigorously blend for 2 minutes or until marshmallows are fully incorporated.
  6. Pour into the prepared baking pan.
  7. Refrigerate for about 2 hours until firm.
  8. Lift from the pan; remove foil. Cut into 48 equal pieces.

ChefSecret: For a delicious variation on this fudge recipe substitute the cherries with a dried berry blend, dried blueberries, apricots, candied pineapple, walnuts, almonds or pistachios.

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What’s Not To Love About Chocolate?

Friday, September 12th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In my book, Choclatique—150 Simply 150 Elegant Desserts, I compared chocolate to the food of the gods. Not only does chocolate make us feel good emotionally, according to a growing community of medical researchers and health professionals it also contributes positively to our physical well being.

As I have written before, eating chocolate improves physical health. A substantial amount of research shows that cocoa flavanols may help control blood pressure and improve cardiovascular health overall. Eating dark chocolate, low in sugar, may also help control blood sugar, and prevents the growth of 1caries which is the bacteria that causes dental cavities. And preliminary research suggests that cocoa flavanols may boost brain health and memory. Scientists aren’t sure how it happens, but surmise that cocoa flavanols may increase blood flow—and therefore oxygen—to the brain. Increasing blood to certain parts of the male anatomy also helps ones’ sex life. Chocolate may very well do for that part of the body what Viagra does, but for far less money.

It turns out that chocolate-lovers may even be more lovable and better lovers! A study published in 2012 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that people who love sweets are likely to be more “sweet.” This may be caused by a change in brain chemistry. The consumption of chocolate floods the brain with dopamine which lights up the reward center of the brain and lifts mood. You can actually see it on a MRI.

The five words that we’ve chosen to identify with chocolate at Choclatique are Passion, Joy, Delight, Desire and Seduction. Following on the latter, one of the most seductive qualities of good chocolate is that it melts precisely at human body temperature, which provides a sensual experience unlike any other food.

Yes, chocolate may truly be the food of the gods.

1 Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or a cavity, is an infection, bacterial in origin, that causes demineralization and destruction of the hard tissues of the teeth—enamel, dentin and cementum. It is a result of the production of acid by bacterial fermentation of food debris accumulated on the tooth surface. If demineralization exceeds saliva and other remineralization factors such as from calcium and fluoridated toothpastes, these once hard tissues progressively break down, producing dental caries or cavities. Today, caries remain one of the most common diseases throughout the world.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Brownie Biscotti

Friday, September 5th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is a fun recipe when you can’t make up your mind if you want a rich fudgy brownie or a crisp, Italian-style cookie. In this recipe you get the best of both—the luscious chocolate taste of a homemade brownie combined with the delightful crunch of biscotti. These are the perfect café cookie, made for dunking in coffee or hot chocolate.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 20 to 25 minutes
Cool Time: 30 minutes
Second Bake Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 24 pieces

Ingredients:
1/3 cup unsalted butter, softened
2/3 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder or Rouge Cocoa Powder
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
1/4 cup lightly roasted pecans, chopped

1 large egg yolk, beaten
1 tablespoon cold water

Directions:>/b>

  1. Preheat the oven to 375° F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment or waxed paper.
  3. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until smooth.
  4. Beat in the vanilla and eggs, one at a time.
  5. In a separate bowl, sift the flour, cocoa powder and baking powder.
  6. Using an electric mixer blend the creamed mixture on low until well blended.
  7. The dough will be stiff and sticky.
  8. Using a large spoon stir in the chocolate chips and nuts.
  9. Divide the dough into two equal parts and place on prepared baking sheet.
  10. Shape each into 9 x 2 x 1-inch logs 4 inches apart.
  11. Beat the egg yolk and water together ad brush the loaves lightly with the mixture.
  12. Bake for 20-25 minutes, until firm.
  13. Remove the loaves from the pan and cool for 30 minutes.
  14. Using a serrated knife, slice the loaves diagonally into 1-inch slices.
  15. Return the slices to the baking sheet, placing them on their sides.
  16. Reduce heat to 350° and bake for 10 minutes on each side or until dry. Cool completely and store in an airtight container.

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The ChocolateDoctor Doughnut History Distorted

Friday, August 22nd, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I read an article the other day that just got me damn mad. Heather Falvey, a so called British historian is now claiming that America didn’t invent the doughnut. How can that be? It is Homer Simpson’s favorite snack and US cops are addicted to them. Have you ever seen an English Bobby eating a doughnut? No, of course not! They eat fish and chips. Listen here, the doughnut is as American as apple pie. I don’t care that this Britt recently unearthed 213-year-old recipe book that puts the doughnut’s legacy into British hands. She claims that Baroness Elizabeth Dimsdale of Hertfordshire was given the recipe by the originator of the doughnut (or “dow nut” as she put it) in 1800, but it’s unclear who this unnamed woman is. The book recipe doesn’t give a lot of instructions on how to make them; It’s more what to use. Who knows, shaped differently, they could be just another English scone. So here’s the real story.

The origin of doughnuts has a disputed history, but it’s all within America. After all, why do you think they call the United States the Promised Land? One theory suggests they were invented in North America by Dutch settlers, who were responsible for popularizing other American desserts, including cookies, apple and cream pie and cobbler. In the 19th century, doughnuts were sometimes referred to as one kind of oliekoek (a Dutch word literally meaning “oil cake”), a “sweetened cake fried in lard.

Hanson Gregory, an American, claimed to have invented the ring-shaped doughnut in 1847 aboard a lime-trading ship when he was only 16 years old. Gregory was dissatisfied with the greasiness of doughnuts twisted into various shapes and with the raw center of regular doughnuts. He claimed to have punched a hole in the center of dough with the ship’s tin pepper box, and later taught the technique to his mother.

According to anthropologist Paul R. Mullins, the first cookbook mentioning doughnuts was an 1803 English volume which included doughnuts in an appendix of American recipes. I believe the anthropology of man, and our nation, can be traced more accurately through the foods and beverages of time, rather than through the riches of art, the prose of literature, the rhythm of music or the structure of architecture. So quit trying to steal our legacy, Heather Falvey, doughnuts belong to America and with a doughnut all things are possible.

Ed’s Chocolate Glazed Yeast Doughnuts

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Proof Time: 30 to 40 minutes
Fry Time: 2 minutes
Ready in: 1 hour
Yield: 2 baker’s dozen doughnuts (that’s 26!)

Ingredients:
For the Doughnuts:

3 1/4 ounce packages “Rapid Rise” yeast (3/4 oz total)
1/2 cup warm water (105-115ºF)
2 1/4 cups whole milk, scalded, then cooled
1 cup granulate sugar
2 teaspoons salt
3 large eggs
1/2 cup shortening
7 cups, plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1/2 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, sifted
canola oil for frying

For the Glaze:
1/2 cup unsalted butter
3 cups powdered sugar, sifted
6 ounce Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate
2 1/4 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
6-9 tablespoons evaporated milk

Directions:
For the Doughnuts:

  1. Proof the yeast by mixing 1 tablespoon of flour with the warm water. Mix it up and let it rest.
  2. Scald the milk in a microwave or on top of a stove, and let cool.
  3. Combine the yeast mixture, cooled milk, sugar, salt, eggs, shortening and 2 1/2 cups of flour and cocoa powder.
  4. Beat on low speed for 30 seconds, scrape down the bowl.
  5. Beat on medium speed for 2 minutes, scraping bowl occasionally.
  6. Carefully stir in remaining flour until the dough is smooth and silky.
  7. Cover the dough and let rise until it doubles, about 30-60 minutes, depending on the yeast you used.
  8. After the dough has risen, turn dough onto floured surface; roll around lightly to coat with flour.
  9. Gently roll dough 1/2-inch thick with floured rolling pin.
  10. Cut with floured doughnut cutter. Separate donuts and holes, as they take different frying times.
  11. Cover and let them rise until doubled in sizes, about 30-40 minutes.

Note: Save your scraps! They are both great to test your fry time and to snack on while you’re making the rest!

Note: If you want to make these donuts for breakfast, let the donuts rise in the refrigerator overnight!

Directions
For the Glaze:

Make the glaze before frying so it can sit at room temperature until the donuts are fried and ready to be dipped.

  1. Melt the butter and chocolate and stir in powdered sugar, cocoa powder and vanilla until blended.
  2. Add the milk until desired consistency is reached.

For Frying the Doughnuts:

  1. Use a deep pan to heat the oil.
  2. Using a frying thermometer heat the oil to 350ºF. Use some of the scraps of the doughnut dough to test different frying times.
  3. Carefully place the donuts in the oil. Cook on each side for about one minute. Use chopsticks to flip the donuts and remove them from the oil.
  4. Place donuts on a rack or paper towels to drain.

For Glazing the Doughnuts:

  1. Dip the doughnuts in the glaze and set them on a rack to dry. It okay to dipped both sides of the doughnuts in the glaze.
  2. Let them set for 10 minutes to set.

ChefSecret: Scalding the milk prevents an enzyme from killing the yeast. If you don’t scald it first to kill the enzyme, the donuts won’t rise.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Cape Cod White Chocolate-Cranberry Bog Cookies

Friday, August 15th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Cranberries are thought to be an indispensable part of our traditional American Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner feasts. For some reason, my mother seems to forget to serve the cranberries during holiday dinners. She used to find it still in the “fridge” when putting away the leftovers. Not wanting to cheat anyone out of their holiday cranberries, I created this recipe using dried cranberries (and chocolate, of course). I think you will find that tart cranberries are the perfect balance for Choclatique’s Snowy White Chocolate Chips.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 to 12 minutes
Ready In: 1 hour
Yield: 36 Cookies

Ingredients:
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter
1/4 cup granulated sugar
3/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 (3.5 ounce) package Jell-O® Instant Vanilla Pudding Mix
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon fresh orange zest
2 large eggs
1 cup Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate Chips
1/2 cup dried cranberries

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 350º F.
  2. Lightly spray two baking sheets with food release.
  3. Combine the flour and baking soda in a bowl and whisk.
  4. Cream the butter, white sugar and brown sugar and with an electric mixer in a large bowl until creamy and smooth; add the instant pudding mix and continue to beat.
  5. Beat the first egg into the butter mixture until completely blended, and then beat in the vanilla and the orange zest with the last egg.
  6. Mix in the flour mixture until just incorporated. It’s okay to see a little flour.
  7. Fold in the white chocolate chips and cranberries; mixing just enough to evenly combine.
  8. Using a 1 ounce scoop or 2 tablespoons drop the dough 2 inches apart onto the sprayed baking sheets.
  9. Bake in the preheated oven until edges of the cookies become golden brown—about 10 to 12 minutes.
  10. Cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes before removing to cool completely on a wire rack.

ChefSecret: You can substitute dried cranberries with dried cherries or blueberries, but then it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving, would it? You can also substitute the orange zest with tangerine or lemon zest.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Bumpy, Rocky Road

Friday, August 8th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In 1950, a Russian Immigrant, Sam Altshuler started the The Annabelle Candy Company in San Francisco. The company was named after Sam’s daughter. It’s like I have always believed, all great trends start in California and Rocky Road was no exception.

The company currently makes 10 different candy bars. Rocky Road, the original marshmallow, chocolate, and cashews bar currently ranks among the top 35 best selling chocolate bars on the West Coast. Annabelle also makes Big Hunk, Look, U-NO and Abba-Zaba candy bars—all my favorites.

This recipe is my take on Sam’s famous, original Rocky Road bar. It’s easy to prepare and makes for wonderful food gifts for Christmas or Easter. If you don’t want to go to the trouble of making it, you can find an Annabelle Rocky Road bar in a candy aisle near you.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Cool Time: 2 hours
Yield: 10 Bars

Ingredients:
8 ounces Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate
2 1/2 ounces Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate
3/4 ounce unsalted butter
1 3/4 ounces mixed mini marshmallows
1 3/4 ounces butter shortbread cookies, chopped into mini marshmallow size sized pieces
3 1/2 ounces salted cashews nuts
3/4 ounce dried cherries

Directions:

  1. Line a 3 x 10-inch loaf pan with plastic food wrap.
  2. Place the milk and dark chocolates with the butter in a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water (don’t let the bowl touch the water); then stir until melted.
  3. Stir marshmallows, cashews and dried cherries into chocolate.
  4. Spread into pan, chill in fridge for 2 hours or until hard. Remove from the pan by lifting the edges of the plastic food wrap.
  5. Slice into 1-inch wide bars on a clean dry cutting board.

ChefSecret: You can replace the cashews with roasted and salted macadamia nuts or blanched, roasted and salted almonds. Any crisp cookie can be used in place of the butter shortbread.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s The Supremes (Chocolate-Raspberry Bars)

Friday, August 1st, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Raspberries combined with our chocolate is one of my favorite, all-time Choclatique flavor thrills. Marry this with a little cream cheese on a crispy, buttery base and you will wind up singing like The Supremes. Okay, that may be a little exaggeration, but you definitely will love the thin layer of tart raspberry jam and the powered sugar crust. The melted chocolate finish is the perfect topping. This is the perfect end-of-meal treat for all occasions—breakfast, lunch and dinner—well at least lunch and dinner.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 15 to 17 minutes
Cooling Time: 2 hours
Yield: 12 bars

Ingredients:
1 cup all-purpose flour, sifted
2 tablespoons Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, sifted
1/4 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup seedless raspberry jam
3 ounces cream cheese, softened
2 tablespoons whole milk
1 cup Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate Chips
2 ounces Choclatique Private Reserve (64%) Chocolate, chopped
2 tablespoon unsalted butter

Directions:
For the base:

    1. Preheat the oven to 375º F.
    2. In a large bowl, whisk to combine the sifted flour, cocoa powder and powered sugar.
    3. Cut in the butter with a fork and mix well. Press mixture into a 9 inch square baking pan.
    4. Bake for 15 to 17 minutes until lightly brown.

For the filling:

    1. Spread jam evenly over baked crust.
    2. In a small bowl beat the cream cheese and milk until smooth.
    3. Melt the white chocolate chips in a microwave and add to mixture. Beat together until smooth.
    4. Drop the cream cheese mixture by tablespoons evenly over the jam. Using metal off-set specula, evenly spread mixture over base.
    5. Refrigerate for at least two hours before glazing and serving.

For the Glaze Topping:

    1. Melt the dark chocolate with butter over low heat (or in a microwave oven), stirring constantly.
    2. Spread over the white chocolate-cream cheese bar layer.
    3. Cool completely. Cut into 12 bars and store in the refrigerator.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Cake Epitome

Friday, July 25th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

There’s a lot to be said when it comes to chocolate cake. But just like with everything else in life, not all chocolate cakes are created equal. The most important thing about a great chocolate cake is that it actually has to taste like chocolate. The consistency should be moist and dense, because chocolate is dense and that’s what you get from this recipe. When it comes to chocolate, this recipe takes the cake. It’s a simple and basic and packs a big chocolate wallop. It is the companion cake to our Choclatique Epitome truffle collection inspired by the growing demand for fine, dark, heirloom chocolate. It is all that the name implies; after all it’s from Choclatique.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 40 to 45 minutes
Yield: Serves 12

Ingredients:
For the cake:

3 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 Cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, 3 tablespoons for dusting
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups granulated sugar
1 cup vegetable oil
1 cup buttermilk
1 large egg
2 teaspoons baking soda
1/2 cup boiling water
1/4 cup very hot coffee
1/4 cup Grand Marnier (or other strong orange-flavored liqueur)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon pure almond extract
1/4 Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips

For the frosting:
3 oz. cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup unsalted butter (1 stick), softened
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/8 teaspoon almond extract
1/2 teaspoon fresh orange zest
1 cup confectioner’s sugar

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 350°.
  2. In a large bowl, sift together the flour, cocoa powder and salt.
  3. In a separate bowl, combine the sugar, oil, buttermilk and egg; mix well.
  4. Add the dry ingredients to the egg mixture and beat well.
  5. Add the baking soda and then add the boiling water, hot coffee and orange liqueur. Mix well.
  6. Stir in the vanilla and almond extracts.
  7. Dust the chocolate chips with cocoa powder to prevent them from sinking to the bottom of the cake. Fold the chips into the batter. The batter will be very thin.
  8. Pour into a greased and cocoa powder dusted 9 x 13 cake pan and bake for 40 to 45 minutes or until a cake tester comes out clean.
  9. Let the cake cool completely before frosting.

For the frosting:

  1. Cream together the cream cheese, orange zest and butter until fluffy.
  2. Add the vanilla and almond extracts, sift in the powdered sugar and beat until well blended, creamy and smooth.

ChefSecret: You can make it in advance and keep it in the freezer – it still tastes great!

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Old Fashioned Chocolate Cookies

Friday, July 18th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I love to share vintage family cookie recipes. These Old Fashioned Chocolate Cookies are circa 1960s. Baking cookies is a wonderful holiday tradition, and there are but few yummier treats you must have on your Christmas (or year-round) cookies plate of every year—this is one of them. They are crisp, delicious and not too sweet—just an old-fashioned cookie perfect for the holiday baking season. Need something to give; think chocolate cookies for homemade holiday gifts. Let the baking begin!

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Chill Time: 2 hours
Bake Time: 8 to 12 minutes per sheet pan
Yield: 3 dozen

Ingredients:
1/2 cup shortening
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup dark corn syrup
2 large eggs, beaten
1/2 tsp. salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
2 cups flour
1/2 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder or Choclatique Rouge Cocoa Powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 cup confectioner’s sugar

Directions:

  1. In a large bowl, cream together the shortening and sugar.
  2. Add the corn syrup, eggs, salt and vanilla extract and mix well.
  3. In a separate bowl, sift together the cardamom, cinnamon, flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and baking powder.
  4. Gradually add to the creamed mixture and beat well.
  5. Scrape down the dough and divide into two portions. Wrap with food film and chill for at least 2 hours.
  6. Preheat oven to 350° F.
  7. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out to 1/4-inch thickness. Cut with your favorite cookie cutters.
  8. Bake on greased cookie sheets for 8 to 12 minutes, depending on size of cutouts.
  9. Cool completely.
  10. Dust with confectioner’s sugar.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Polish Cheesecake

Friday, July 11th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Cheesecakes (Sernik, pronounced SEHRR-neek) are a national dish of Poland and are revered in every Eastern European cuisine. The cheese typically used is dry-curd, cottage cheese, not cream cheese as in the United States. This results in a different finished texture but is still delicious in its own right. I like to add the magic of chocolate to make this cheesecake even yummier. This cheesecake is a bit tart, but still creamy enough to be called a great Polish cheesecake.

Prep Time: 1 hour plus
Chill Time: 8 to 12 hours, plus 1 hour rising after rolling out dough
Bake Time: 30 to 40 minutes
Yield: Serves 8 to 10

Ingredients:
For the dough:

1 packet dry yeast
1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar
2 tablespoons warm water (about 108º F)
1/3 cup unsalted butter
1/4 cup granulated sugar
3/4 cups cake flour
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 large egg, plus 1 egg yolk
1/2 cup whole milk (lukewarm), divided

For the filling:
1 large (32-oz.) carton small curd cottage cheese
6 large egg yolks
1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup sour cream
2 teaspoon orange liqueur or pure orange extract
1 teaspoon minced orange peel
4 tablespoon Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 cup dried cherries (soak in 1/2 cup boiling water for 10 minutes and then drain well)
2 tablespoons Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Chips
1/3 cup Choclatique Private Reserve Pastilles

Directions:
For the crust:

  1. Combine the yeast and the sugar with warm water and set aside to activate the yeast. The yeast mixture should be a frothy, bubbly brown after 10 minutes.
  2. Using an electric mixer cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
  3. Add the flours, cocoa powder and salt and mix. The mixture will be pebbly, like for pie crust.
  4. In a separate bowl, beat the egg with 1/4 cup of the milk.
  5. Add to the flour mixture along with the yeast. Slowly add the rest of the milk and mix well.
  6. Turn out the dough and knead by hand.
  7. Cover the dough in the bowl and refrigerate overnight.

For the filling:

  1. Using a food processor combine the cottage cheese, egg yolks, sugar, salt, sour cream, lemon juice, orange peel, cocoa powder and vanilla extract and mix until smooth. Make sure to smooth out the curds in the cottage cheese.
  2. Stir in the plumped cherries and chocolate chips.

To assemble:

  1. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface and form into a rectangle.
  2. Place in the bottom and up along the sides of a 9 x 13 pan.
  3. Slowly melt the chocolate in a glass bowl in a microwave oven for 30 seconds at 50% power in 30 seconds burst, stirring between each burst.
  4. Brush the chocolate in a thin layer over the top of the crust.
  5. Spread the cheese filling over the crust and let the dough rise for 1 hour.
  6. Bake in a preheated 350° F oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until just set.

ChefSecret: You can also substitute ricotta cheese for the cottage cheese, but then it would have to be called an Italian Cheesecake.

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