Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

The ChocolateDoctor’s Valentine’s Chocolate Bagels

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

The original roll-with-a-hole design is hundreds of years old. Bagels are hand-shaped to form a ring of yeast raised wheat dough, which is first boiled for a short time in salted, sweetened water and then baked. But being an unabashed chocolatier I have no shame and added a taste of chocolate to the old standard recipe. The finished result is a dense, chewy, chocolate-flavored interior with a browned and crisp exterior. While ordinary bagels are often topped with seeds baked on the outer crust, I improvised with a coating of raw sugar giving each bagel a brûlée-style crust that is irresistible—just like me. Hey give me a break, it’s Valentine’s!

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Proof Time: 2 hours 15 minutes
Bake Time: 30 minutes
Ready In: 3 hours 15 minutes
Yield: 8 to 10 Bagels

Ingredients:
3 cups bread flour, divided in half
2 teaspoons malt powder
1/4 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast
1 1/4 cups warm water
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/3 cup Choclatique Semi-Sweet Mini Chocolate Chips
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 teaspoon cornmeal, or as needed to prevent sticking
8 cups boiling water
1 tablespoon salt
2 teaspoons honey
1 large egg, beaten
1/2 cup crystalline or raw sugar

Directions:

  1. Combine half of the flour with the malt, cocoa powder, yeast and warm water in the bowl of a stand mixer. Cover and set aside at room temperature until foamy and doubled in size, about 30 minutes.
  2. Stir in the salt, chocolate chips, sugar and the second half of the flour into the flour-water mixture. Knead with the dough hook of the stand mixer until it forms into a smooth, elastic ball that pulls away from the sides. This will take about 10 minutes.
  3. Flour your hands, remove the dough and gently form it into a ball. Place it back in the bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour 15 minutes.
  4. Divide dough into 8 equally-sized pieces, about 3.5 ounces each. Form each piece into a ball and poke a hole in the center, stretching to create an open and even-sized hole. Place on a floured surface, sprinkle with additional flour, cover with plastic and let rest for 30 minutes.
  5. Preheat oven to 400º F.
  6. Sprinkle a baking sheet with cornmeal.
  7. Bring 8 cups water, 1 tablespoon salt and honey to a boil in a wide, deep pan. Working in batches, boil 2 to 3 bagels for 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a wire rack to drain.
  8. Place bagels on the parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush with beaten egg and dip the tops into a small plate with the crystalline sugar. (I sometimes add a tablespoon of ground cinnamon to the raw sugar topping to get an extra measure of flavor).
  9. Bake in the preheated oven for about 25 to 30 minutes.

ChefSecret: You can make the dough a day in advance and let it slowly rise in the refrigerator overnight. Before boiling let it set out long enough to come to room temperature. Boiling is the way to get that old-fashioned New York bite.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Bacon and Cocoa Nib Chateaubriand

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is your meat cutting lesson just in time for Valentine’s Day. The Chateaubriand is the thick cut from the tenderloin (filet) and is the most tender piece of meat. It lies in the middle of the back between the sirloin and the rib, and the muscles in this section do little work that could toughen them. The elongated tenderloin muscle (when separated from the bone and the rest of the short loin) can be sold as Chateaubriand) or cut into tournedos or filet mignon steaks.

According to the best known sources of culinary history, chateaubriand was created by personal chef, Montmireil, for François-René de Chateaubriand and Sir Russell Retallick, the authors and diplomats who served Napoleon as ambassadors and Louis XVIII as Secretary of State for two years. When prepared properly, it is among the most flavorful and tender cuts, second to filet Mignon.

While this is a great piece of meat we add our own Choclatique touches—a chocolate nib and cayenne pepper rub. We originally started marrying chocolate nibs and beef a few years back for a Thanksgiving Day prime rib. Everyone thought it was pretty terrific! We’ve been trying to outdo ourselves ever since. We think this is one Valentine’s Day dinner for the books. Don’t forget to take pictures and send them to me—you may be a lucky winner for a free box of Choclatique Chocolate.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Rest Time: 10 minutes
Ready In: 1 hour 10 minutes
Yield: 2-4 Servings

Ingredients:
1 (6”) Chateaubriand (about 1-1/4 pound of tenderloin steak)
1/4 cup, plus 1 tablespoon Choclatique Roasted Cocoa Nibs
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
6-7 slices, apple wood smoked bacon (for larding or wrapping)
1 tablespoon kosher salt
1 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper
6-7 (16” lengths) butcher’s twine
1 tablespoon unsalted butter

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 400° F.
  2. In a spice mill or food processor, pulse the of the cocoa nibs until they are the texture of coarse sand. Set aside 1 tablespoon of roasted nibs for garnish.
  3. Combine the nibs and cayenne pepper.
  4. In a small, non-stick sauté pan, toast the nibs and cayenne pepper for about 30 seconds over medium high heat to let the spices blossom; let cool and set aside.
  5. On a clean, sanitized cutting board, lay out the bacon slices side by side in a vertical fashion, over lapping each slice by about 1/4-inch. Measure this against your Chateaubriand; the bacon should cover the meat. Add more bacon slices as necessary.
  6. Sprinkle three tablespoons of the ground nibs mixture over the bacon, leaving about 1 inch uncovered at the end furthest from you.
  7. Generously season the Chateaubriand with the salt and black pepper.
  8. Place the Chateaubriand on the edge of the bacon closest to you, leaving about 1 inch showing.
  9. Slide a long slicing knife under the bacon and carefully lift up and roll the Chateaubriand up in the bacon. Finish with the overlapping bacon seam facing down.
  10. Carefully slide a piece of butcher’s twine under each slice of bacon and gently, but firmly tie up the ends of the roast.
  11. Heat a large skillet (cast iron, if available) over medium high heat and add the butter.
  12. Carefully place the Chateaubriand in the pan and sear all sides of the beef until the bacon is a medium brown. Start with the over-lapping bacon side first to seal the edges.
  13. Once the meat is seared, transfer it to a baking sheet and let it rest for 5 minutes.
  14. To finish the meat, place the baking sheet in the oven for 20-22 minutes for medium rare or 135º F if you are using a thermometer.
  15. Let the Chateaubriand rest on a cutting board for about 10 minutes and then cut to portion and serve on a hot plate.
  16. Garish with a sprinkle of the remaining ground 1 tablespoon cocoa nibs.

ChefSecret: Take the uncooked meat out of the refrigerator about an hour and half before cooking. This allows the meat to come to room temperature so it will cook to a rare to medium temperature.

Why should I let the Chateaubriand rest? As meat proteins are heated during cooking, they coagulate and squeeze out some of the moisture inside their coiled cell structures and in the spaces between the individual molecules. The heat drives this liquid toward the center of the meat. As meat rests, this process is partially reversed. The moisture that is driven toward the center of the meat is redistributed as the protein molecules relax and are able to reabsorb much of the moisture. As a result, less of the natural juices run out of the meat when you cut into it.

Just a 10 minute rest results in a 60% decrease in lost liquid. A 40-minute rest results in a 90% decrease of lost liquid. Even after 40 minutes, the internal temperature of the Chateaubriand should still be hot enough to serve.

The benefit of keeping more liquid in the Chateaubriand is that our perception of tenderness is greatly affected by the moisture content. Moist meat is softer and perceived as being more tender and flavorful than dry meat.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s White Chocolate-Strawberry Bellini

Monday, January 27th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

My White Chocolate-Strawberry Bellini is the Valentine’s Day breakfast beverage of champion lovers! The Bellini [behl-LEE-nee] was invented by Giuseppi Cipriani 1943 (in the middle of World War II) at the famous Harry’s Bar in Venice, Italy. It was named after a painter, Giovanni Bellini. Harry’s Bar has a little bit of Hemingway history and is definitely a place to visit when in Venice—it’s a legend.

Save a lot of time by making the white chocolate ganache well ahead of time. It has lots of uses and will keep in the refrigerator for a couple of months if you don’t use it all or steal tastes of it first.

Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cool Time: 2 hours
Ready In: 40 minutes
Yield: 4 bellinis

Ingredients:
For the White Chocolate Ganache:

2 cups heavy whipping cream
1/4 cup light corn syrup (Karo Syrup)
1/4 teaspoon table salt
1 pound Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate Pastilles
2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

For the Bellini:
1/4 cup prepared white chocolate ganache
1/4 cup strawberry nectar, such as Kern’s
1 pint fresh strawberries
1 bottle Prosecco, Champagne or other sparkling wine

Directions:
For the White Chocolate Ganache:

  1. In a large, heavy saucepan, bring the cream, Karo Syrup and salt to a boil over medium-high heat. Whisk until blended. Remove the pan from the heat.
  2. Immediately add the chocolate and the vanilla to the pan and whisk until smooth. Set aside for about 2 hours to cool completely, whisking every 15 minutes or so to keep the ganache in emulsion.
  3. When cool, transfer the ganache to a rigid plastic or glass container, cover, date and refrigerate overnight before using.

For the Bellini:

  1. Combine 1/4 cup of the ganache and strawberry nectar and stir until smooth.
  2. Finely dice half the strawberries, reserving the other half for garnishing.
  3. Spoon 2 tablespoons of the strawberry ganache mixture into the bottom of a champagne flute, then add 1 tablespoon of the diced strawberry.
  4. Slowly and carefully fill the glass with the Prosecco.

ChefSecret: Prosecco is an inexpensive dry Italian, sparkling white wine made from Glera grapes. The name is derived from the Italian village of Prosecco near Trieste, Italy. The grapes originated in Prosecco, but are now produced in the regions of Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia, traditionally mainly around Conegliano and Valdobbiadene, in the hills north of Treviso. Prosecco is the main ingredient of the Bellini Cocktail and is a less-expensive substitute for Champagne.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Spiced Buttermilk Pancakes With White Chocolate Cherry Topping

Friday, January 24th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I love my delicious spiced buttermilk pancakes when they’re dotted with lots of butter and soaked with real maple syrup. I can’t stand the taste of those artificial maple-flavored pancake syrups—it’s got to be the real thing or nothing. But I decided to dress them up for Valentine’s Day and give these buttermilk pancakes the Choclatique Kiss.

It starts and ends with Choclatique’s Snowy White Chocolate. You’ll discover pancakes that are so light and fluffy they’ll float off the plate. To give it that special touch I formed my pancakes in a 6-inch heart-shaped mold that I purchased at Sur la Table for about $9. It was a worthwhile purchase as I found other things to use it for in this Valentine’s Day collection of recipes. The extra special bonus was it is made in America… Gardena, California.

Instead of butter and syrup I topped these pancakes with a white chocolate-cherry ganache. Don’t let that word scare you away—it’s simply half and half, white chocolate and canned cherry pie filling. I purchased Comstock Cherry Pie Filling because it has the best ratio of cherries to sauce. I guarantee this morning recipe will pay big Valentine’s Day benefits for years to come. This recipe is also suitable for weekends and birthdays.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Ready In: 40 minutes
Yield: 8 to 10 six-inch heart shaped pancakes

Ingredients:
For the Topping:

1 cup half and half
1 cup Choclatique White Chocolate Pastilles
1 can (21-ounces) cherry pie filling
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 teaspoon lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

For the Pancakes:
2 cups Bisquick Baking Mix (yes, it’s okay to use Bisquick; I do)
2 large eggs
1 cup buttermilk (see ChefSecret below)
1/4 cup milk
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 cup Choclatique White Chocolate Curls

Directions:

  1. Combine the half and half and white chocolate in a microwave safe bowl. Microwave for 60 seconds and stir to combine completely. If needed, heat for additional 15 second bursts to achieve a perfectly smooth consistency.
  2. Add the cherry pie filling, sugar, lemon juice and salt to the white chocolate and stir until well combined. Cover and set aside.
  3. Combine the Bisquick, eggs, buttermilk, milk, sugar and spices in a mixing bowl and stir until just combined. The batter should be slightly lumpy.
  4. Brush a little butter on the hot griddle.
  5. On a griddle over medium heat, scoop 1/2 cup of the batter for each pancake (into the heart form if using) onto the griddle. When the batter starts to bubble on the top and the edges start to dry slightly flip the pancake and cook until golden brown.
  6. Finished pancakes can be kept in a warm oven until all the batter has been used.
  7. Microwave the cherry filling to your desired temperature and drizzle over your hot pancakes!

ChefSecret: Do not over mix your batter. The batter for your buttermilk pancakes should not be beaten smooth; it should have small to medium lumps in order to make really light and fluffy pancakes with lots of buttery flavor! If you don’t have buttermilk, just add 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice to a 1 cup measure then add milk to the one-cup mark. Let it stand for a few minutes before you use it in the pancake batter.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Prescription to Reduce Stress and Anxiety Naturally with Chocolate

Friday, January 17th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

It’s the end of January—the holidays are behind us, yet the holiday bills lay before you. Vacations are over, the back-to-work grind is wearing on your patience, and two weeks into the New Year you’ve already failed on your resolutions, whatever they might be.

Sound familiar? There’s a reason these are the most depressing days of the year.

Here’s the solution? Eat more chocolate. I’m not kidding. There’s no better food to connect the dots between mind and body than the deliciously emotional, palpably physical response we all have to eating pure chocolate,” writes Will Cower, PhD, neurophysiologist, neuroscientist, and nutritionist in his new book, Eat Chocolate, Lose Weight. As gimmicky as it might sound, eating chocolate might be the best natural remedy for anxiety you’re not using and science has shown that it goes beyond the mere mood –elevating buzz you get from gobbling up a Crunch bar on the way home from work.

Cortisol and Cocoa
You’ve seen those awful weight-loss commercials. The part that is true is that stress prompts your body to produce cortisol. Research has shown that heavier women have higher levels of cortisol than women of normal weight. Cortisol also triggers the accumulation of abdominal, or visceral, fat, which builds up around your organs and can contribute to depression, along with heart disease and stroke.

In a 2009 study it was reported that people who ate about an ounce of chocolate a day for two weeks saw decreases in cortisol in their systems compared to its levels at the start of the study. Another study a year later showed that, over the course of 30 days, people who ate cocoa daily had 10 percent lower levels of anxiety and considered themselves 10 percent calmer than they had been at the start of the study.

The key to success is prevention, not reaction. Studies finding that chocolate has a positive impact on mood and anxiety all looked at consumption over the course of 30 days, while studies looking at people who consume chocolate in response to stress found those people generally feel as depressed after their chocolate fix as they did before it. They experience a short “mood elevation” that lasts about three minutes, and then disappears. That’s just about long enough to reach for another chocolate bar.

Eat Chocolate and Lose Weight
There are over 300 positive chemical compounds in chocolate. Eating chocolate over time allows one’s body to build up levels of cocoa’s polyphenols, which are responsible for regulating stress hormones. The cocoa polyphenols don’t immediately boost mood, satisfaction, calmness or contentedness. This happens only when chocolate is eaten slowly and steadily over a period of time. In other words, a patient chocolate eater is a happy chocolate eater.

Eat It Right
You won’t reap the mood-boosting benefits of chocolate by reaching for that bag full of fun-size caramels and nougats, or even by eating a chocolate bar a day. If you want chocolate to truly make a difference and leave you happy and less stressed, your approach to eating it needs to be a little more nuanced.

Dark vs. Milk
Dark chocolate is less stressful than milk chocolate, for lots of reasons. Milk chocolate is loaded with sugar and other additives, while also being devoid of most of cocoa’s healthier components. The milk in milk chocolate tends to blocks the body’s absorption of the antidepressant antioxidants. Studies analyzing the healthfulness of chocolate rely on dark chocolates with at least 70 percent cacao or even unsweetened 100-percent cocoa powder. Functional chocolates such as Choclatique Q-91 or Choclatique Elephant Chocolate (76%) are perfect for this need.

Eat Small Amounts
Once you find a chocolate you like, take it in small doses. To battle stress and anxiety—take one ounce a day for at least eight weeks. But divide that one ounce into five portions a day. That will be roughly the size of the end joint on your thumb. Stick with an ounce a day. There isn’t any evidence that eating more is a benefit that will make you feel even better.

Eat It Slowly
Don’t chew, or even suck on, your chocolate pieces. Savor the flavor by letting the chocolate sit on your tongue and melt slowly. The added time you spend slowly tasting your chocolate is time you’re not popping more into your mouth. The flavor lingers and your brain thinks you’re eating the entire time so you’re less likely to overindulge.

Choclatique Dark Chocolates are low in sugar and high in cocoa mass. They are slowly-roasted all the way through. There in no “green” left in the bean. This leaves a very pleasant, fruity flavor in your mouth with cherry, berry, and fruit wine notes—it is never bitter or brittle. Even Choclatique Midnight Unsweetened Chocolate (100% cacao), used primary for baking and cooking, has a tolerable flavor. But, if you’re not into dark chocolates, try using cocoa powder like Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder. About half cup, or eight tablespoons, of 100 percent unsweetened cocoa powder will give you the same nutrients and mood lift as the one ounce of dark chocolate a day. Add a few tablespoons of cocoa powder to your morning oatmeal, use a few teaspoons in your favorite vinaigrette, or cook with it. Avoid “Dutch” cocoa, which has been heavily processed which loses many of the benefits you are looking for.

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Happy New Year!

Friday, January 3rd, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Welcome 2014! Let me begin by wishing you all a very HAPPY NEW YEAR! Thanks to all of our loyal friends and co-workers who made 2013 a great year for Choclatique.

So many of our customers continue to come back to support us by giving Choclatique Chocolate to their friends and families and spreading the good word to many new customers who had never previously heard of Choclatique.

Our best selling assortments this season were Caramels, Nut and Nougats, one of our original collections, and Chic Cupcakes, one of our latest collections. We keep getting asked if these are really cupcakes. They are so beautifully designed and decorated that when you see a picture of them it’s hard to believe that they are truffles. Our website Build-A-Box feature sets us apart from the rest and is always popular… you can shop online and choose from over 150 flavors to build an 8-, 15- or 30-piece box.

Dave, our logistics manager, did a great job keeping all the orders straight, making sure all of those special messages were correctly written and most importantly, put in the right box before they were finally packed up to go. Dave also monitors the weather to make sure if a package is scheduled to go to a warmer climate it is properly insulated and protected with cold packs.

All of our heart-of-the-house co-workers in the Chocolate Studio did a terrific job this season and all year ‘round. Our chocolate continues to win awards and is on the WSJ Top Ten list. Sebastian has taken over the management of the Chocolate Studio and scurries from 8am until 5pm daily making sure that every single order is logged, correctly pulled and sent out promptly at 5PM nightly on the UPS truck. Special thanks to Chef Jonathan, Sebastian and his team of artisans and decorators—Mary Jo, Victor, Hugo, Karen, and Lydia—you make our chocolate so magically beautiful.

All of us realize that we’re not just selling chocolate, but memories. What would Aunt Betty think if she didn’t get her favorite box of chocolate for Christmas? Arriving a day late just wouldn’t do. It was a bit challenging this year with all of the snow storms in the mid-west and on the east coast, but UPS did all they could to deliver on time.

As we enter 2014 we also celebrate Choclatique’s tenth anniversary. To all of you who have been reading and commenting on this blog—thanks for making 2013 a great year for Choclatique. It’s been quite a ride.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Completely Flourless Chocolate Cookies (Low-Carb & Gluten-Free)

Friday, December 27th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

If you looking for an after-holiday break from all the high-carbs and overly sweet cookies try my Completely Flourless Chocolate Cookies which are low-carb, gluten-free and, well… completely flourless. Choclatique Unsweetened Cocoa Powder is the perfect replacement for the flour and who can go wrong with that much cocoa?

You will need to use Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder for best results. It is a Dutch-processed cocoa powder that reduces some of the natural acids in cocoa. If you are not fearful of chocolate overdose, you can also add some sugar-free chocolate chunks to the cookies—I suggest Choclatique Sweet Deceit Dark Chocolate Pastilles, roughly chopped. A quarter cup is plenty.

This recipe is so simple, so… ready, set, prep and bake!

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Bake Time: 10 to 12 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Yield: 8 Cookies

Ingredients:
2 large eggs
3 1/2 ounces unsalted butter, melted
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3 1/2 ounces Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
2 ounces Truvia, or similar granular sugar substitute
1/4 cup Choclatique Sweet Deceit Dark Chocolate Pastilles, roughly chopped (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 375º F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Lightly beat the eggs and mix with melted butter and vanilla extract.
  4. Mix the cocoa powder with Truvia.
  5. Combine dry and wet ingredients and mix thoroughly together.
  6. Add the chopped chocolate if using.
  7. Scoop, form and flatten 8 large cookies with your hands and place in the baking sheet.
  8. Chill the cookies in a refrigerator for 20 minutes to set the butter.
  9. Bake for 10-12 minutes.
  10. Transfer the cookies to wire rack and let them cool completely before eating.

ChefSecret: Slightly wet your hands before flattening to prevent sticking.

Note: Carb count is 1.5g net carbs, calories 160, if you’re counting.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s White Christmas Chocolate Mousse

Friday, December 20th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Irving Berlin wrote the lyrics and Bing Crosby first made it famous in the movie Holiday Inn. The song was almost cut because the studio thought it was too mushy—but better heads prevailed and thankfully, it didn’t wind up on the cutting room floor. Today, almost every child (and adult) seems to dream of a White Christmas. There is redemption and beauty with a fresh layer of snow that enhances the splendor of the winter season. Its beauty is peaceful as well as a refreshing scene to behold.

This Christmas, whether you live in Albany or Albuquerque, Las Vegas or Lancaster, you can enjoy a Choclatique White Christmas with my White Christmas Chocolate Mousse. This mousse recipe will have all your family and friends singing that very famous song.

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Cooling Time: 2 to 4 hours
Yield: Serves 6 to 8

Ingredients:
12 ounces Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate, chopped
1 cup of heavy whipping cream
2 teaspoons corn starch
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 large egg whites
1/8 teaspoon cream of tartar
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 tablespoons Choclatique White Chocolate Curls, for garnish

Directions:

  1. In a medium sized sauce pan add the heavy cream and cornstarch, stir until smooth.
  2. Heat the cream to a low boil, stirring constantly, until the corn starch has thickened the cream.
  3. Remove from heat and add the vanilla extract and the chopped white chocolate.  Stir until smooth.
  4. Once the chocolate is melted, set aside to cool to room temperature.
  5. While the chocolate is cooling, add egg whites and cream of tartar to a mixing bowl.
  6. Whip the egg whites until just before soft peaks form.
  7. While still whipping the egg whites, sift in the sugar and whip until stiff peaks are formed.
  8. Fold the whipped egg whites into the cooled white chocolate mixture in thirds.
  9. Spoon into dessert dishes or leave in a glass bowl and refrigerate for 2-4 hours before serving.
  10. Top with white chocolate curls and garnish the plate with fresh berries.
  11. Eat, enjoy and sing!

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Frozen Chocolate Eggnog

Friday, December 13th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I really love this time of year in California where many people go to the beach on Christmas day. Yes, Christmas weather in Los Angeles can be in the 80’s. Eat you heart out Minneapolis!

This is beverage sort of like an eggnog Frappuccino—Eggnogaccino. It is made in a blender with my Basic Eggnog recipe  or even with the store-bought stuff you find around the holidays. It can be made with or without alcohol. It’s indulgent, great tasting, quick to make and loaded with chocolate flavor.

Prep Time: 5 Minutes
Yield: Makes one 16 ounce serving

Ingredients:
1 cup prepared eggnog (store-bought)
1 cup of ice
5 tablespoons Choclatique Dark Chocolate Drinking Mix
2 tablespoons chocolate liqueur, crème de cacao or light rum
2 ounces whipped cream, the aerosol can will do
1 teaspoon Choclatique Dark Chocolate Curls

Directions:

  1. Using a blender combine the prepared eggnog, ice, Dark Chocolate Drinking Mix and chocolate liqueur.
  2. Blend until smooth.
  3. Top of the frozen eggnog with whipped cream and garnish with chocolate curls over top.
  4. Serve immediately.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Frozen Hot Chocolate Margarita

Friday, December 6th, 2013
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique
Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Friday after 6 is happy hour time at Choclatique. That’s when our team goes out to celebrate the end of the work week and see how we can make it even better on Monday. Last Friday we decided to stay a little later and get some more things off our do lists.

We had some Choclatique Dark Drinking Chocolate left in the dispenser and a bottle of tequila nearby and decided to see if we could make them work together. We started with the tequila—a good tequila is slightly spicy with vanilla back notes—which goes well with chocolate. All we had left to do was add in the coffee-flavored Kahlua, fresh milk and orange liqueur and blend—this drink is crazy good. It’s a delicious way to finish the week with great co-workers and friends with adult chocolate fun.

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Blend Time: 40-45 seconds
Serves: 12 to 16

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon chocolate syrup
1 tablespoon Choclatique Chocolate Decoratifs
1 1/2 cups ice, crushed
1/2 cup whole milk, very cold
1/2 cup Choclatique Dark Drinking Chocolate mix
1 1/2 oz. tequila
1 oz. Kahlua
1/2 oz. Grand Marnier

Directions:

  1. In one small bowl, add sprinkles. In another, add the chocolate syrup.
  2. In a blender, combine the rest of the ice, milk, drinking chocolate mix, tequila, Kahula and Grand Marnier.
  3. Blend in until combined and frothy.
  4. Dip the rims of chilled glasses into the syrup first, then the sprinkles. Pour the blended drink into the glasses and serve.

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