Archive for the ‘Food’ Category

The ChocolateDoctor’s Homemade Chocolate Ganache Blocks

Friday, January 30th, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

This is sort of a “guys” recipe even if he is somewhat cooking-challenged but still wants to make something chocolaty for his favorite gal. It is a non-fussy truffle without all the scooping. It’s really just chop, melt and cook—anyone can do it. In fact, it’s even a blast to make with the kids. Don’t be afraid to use the dried chipotle pepper, it will enhance the chocolate with a warm glow, not a hot burn. You’ll find it is just the perfect combination of chocolate and orange with just a hint of warmth.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Chill Time: 35 minutes
Ready In: 50 minutes
Yield: 30 Truffle Blocks

Ingredients:
1/2 pound Choclatique Private Reserve Chocolate (64%), chopped
1/8 teaspoon ground dried chipotle pepper
1/8 teaspoon pinch salt
1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon orange zest
3 tablespoons Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder

Directions:

  1. Place the chopped chocolate into a medium size bowl; add the chipotle pepper and salt.
  2. Heat the cream, vanilla extract and orange zest in a small saucepan over medium-low heat until it just comes to a boil.
  3. Pour the hot cream mixture over chocolate and let it stand for 2 or 3 minutes until the chocolate has melted.
  4. Using a clean dry spatula stir until the chocolate mixture is completely smooth.
  5. Pour chocolate mixture out onto a sheet of plastic wrap on a work surface. Pick up one edge of the plastic and roll the chocolate into a rough log shape. Refrigerate until firm; about 35 minutes.
  6. Place cocoa powder into a small bowl. Unwrap chocolate and cut in half crosswise; cut each half into halves lengthwise. Roughly cut candy into 1/2-inch square blocks.
  7. Gently toss the chocolate pieces into the cocoa to coat.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s The Choclatique Burger

Friday, January 23rd, 2015
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Before McDonald’s, Burger King and Wendy’s occupied the world’s hamburger landscape there were Woody’s Smorgasburgers all over California. Woody’s was one of the first chains where you could get a hamburger and then carry it over to a little self-service topping counter stocked with ketchup, mustard, onions, pickles, salsa, barbecue sauce, etc., and create whatever you wanted.

Every Woody’s also had a “make your own sundae” bar where you could fill a dish full of soft-serve ice cream, then add a selection of syrups, sprinkles, crushed peanuts and such.

One of my friends asked the manager if it was okay to put the toppings from the sundae bar on his burger or vice-versa. Mmmmm… what would hot fudge or whipped cream do to a hamburger and would maraschino cherries blend with the mustard? I was one of the guys who discovered that chopped peanuts and caramel sauce tasted great on a Woody’s burger. So it wasn’t a big leap of faith for me to add a little chocolate.

They say that chocolate is the magic elixir to your lover’s heart. Win them over with my Choclatique Burger—with a Chipotle Cocoa Aioli, Cocoa-Butter Bun Spread and Cocoa Nib topping (in place of the peanuts). Hold the mustard, ketchup and pickle and enjoy a new kind of Valentine’s Day burger.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Ready In: 60 minutes
Yield: 2 hamburgers

Ingredients:
For the Chipotle Cocoa Aioli:

1 cup mayonnaise
2 teaspoons Choclatique Natura Cocoa Powder
1 tablespoon sour cream
1 tablespoon chipotle in adobo sauce, finely chopped (about 1 pepper)

For the Cocoa-Butter Spread:
1/4 cup unsalted butter, softened
1 teaspoon Choclatique Natura Cocoa Powder

For the Burgers:
1/2 cup caramelized onions, dark brown
1 tablespoon canola oil
2 hamburger patties, 1/4 to 1/3 pound each
4 teaspoons Choclatique Cocoa-Nibs
2 thick slices Jarlsberg or Gruyere cheese
2 leaves green leaf lettuce
2 slices beefsteak tomato, sliced 1/4” thick
4 slices cooked bacon
2 hamburger buns, preferably brioche

Directions:

  1. Combine the mayonnaise, cocoa powder, sour cream and adobe sauce in a small bowl and mix until smooth. Cover and refrigerate.
  2. With an electric mixer combine the softened butter and cocoa powder. Beat on low speed for 15 seconds until the cocoa powder is absorbed. Increase speed to medium and mix until butter is soft and fluffy, occasionally scraping the sides down with a spatula. Set aside.
  3. Caramelize the onions in butter until nicely browned; set aside.
  4. Preheat a large sauté pan over medium heat.
  5. Liberally spread the butter over each side of both buns and toast the buns on the sauté pan until crispy and deep golden brown. Cool and set aside, uncovered, toasted side up.
  6. Turn up the heat to medium high on the sauté pan and add the canola oil. Season the hamburger patties with salt and pepper and place in the pan.
  7. Once a nice crust has formed on the underside of the patties, flip the burgers and carefully sprinkle 1-2 teaspoons of cocoa nibs on each patty and cover with a slice of cheese. Cook until hamburgers have reached desired doneness.
  8. Liberally spread both sides of the bun with the aioli. Place the lettuce and tomato on the bottom bun, then add the hamburger patty and the caramelized onions. Finish with 2 slices of bacon and the top bun and enjoy!

ChefSecret: Covering your sauté pan for 30 seconds or so before removing the hamburger patties will ensure a nice melt on your cheese. Make the aioli a day ahead of time for the best flavor, as the time will allow the flavors to come together completely.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Ode To Reverend Sylvester Graham (1794 – 1851) Featuring My California Cream Cheese Pie Recipe

Friday, October 3rd, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

You can’t write fiction this good.

This is the story of Reverend Sylvester Graham for whom the graham cracker was named. He was an early advocate of dietary reform in the United States, most noted for his emphasis on vegetarianism and temperance as well as lean and bland dietary habits.

Graham was a Presbyterian in Bound Brook, New Jersey, and came up with the idea of the graham wafer in 1829. The original wafer was made with graham flour (of course), a combination of finely-ground, unbleached wheat flour (with the wheat bran and germ coarsely-ground and added back into the flour providing a good source of nutrition) and additional flavor, negating the need for sweeteners. While graham crackers started out as a mild unsweetened food, today they are more commonly known as honey grahams.

The Reverend originally conceived graham crackers as sort of a health food for both the body and the mind to become part of what was to be known as the Graham Diet. This regimen was supposed to suppress what he considered unhealthy thoughts (carnal urges), the source of many maladies according to Graham. Reverend Graham often lectured his flock on the evils of “self-abuse.” He stated these experiences were inspired by children eating sugar and sweetened cookies. One of his many now outdated theories was that one could curb one’s sexual appetite by eating bland foods. Another man who held this belief was John Kellogg, the inventor of the Kellogg’s Corn Flakes. You can only imagine what Kellogg and Graham would think of today’s Frosted Flakes and chocolate-covered graham crackers.

Today, commercially produced modern graham crackers are comprised mainly of the refined, bleached white flour to which the Reverend Graham was opposed, and others are made with blends that use unbleached, white flour as a base. Graham crackers have remained popular in North America as a snack food, breakfast cereal and the base of a really great cheesecake. Most commercial graham crackers could no longer be considered a health food. In fact, some of these commercially-baked “graham crackers” are more notable for being topped with a thick crust of cinnamon and sugar or having cocoa powder added to the mix.

Despite all of this, basic modern graham crackers are common in America as a snack for young children (at home or at preschool, elementary school and other child care facilities) usually accompanied with fruit juice or milk.

Graham crackers, along with roasted marshmallows and milk chocolate bars, are used to make a Girl Scout campfire treat—S’mores. Graham crackers have moved on to a higher plane or as what the good Reverenced might have said, same church different pew.

The ChocolateDoctor’s California Cream Cheese Pie

Made with a Graham Cracker Crust

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Baking Time: 30 minutes
Cooling Time: 5 hours, plus 10 minutes
Total Time: 6 hours 30 minutes
Yield: Serves 8 to 10

Ingredients:
4 (3 oz.) packages cream cheese (room temperature)
2 large eggs, beaten (room temperature)
2 tablespoons sour cream
1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
3/4 cup granulated sugar
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

For the graham cracker crust:
12 to 14 graham crackers, finely crumbled
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted

For the sour cream topping:
1 cup sour cream
3 1/2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon zest

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 350º F.
  2. Combine all the ingredients above and beat until light and frothy.
  3. Pour into the prepared graham cracker crust (see recipe below) and bake in 350 degree oven for 15 to 20 minutes.
  4. Remove from oven and cool for 5 minutes.
  5. Reduce the oven temperature to 325º F.
  6. Pour the sour cream topping (see recipe below) over the baked pie. Return to the pie to the oven and bake 10 minutes longer.
  7. Cool for 30 minutes on a rack.
  8. Refrigerate at least 5 hours before serving.

For the graham cracker crust:

  1. Combine cracker crumbs, cinnamon and butter thoroughly. Pat into 9-inch pie pan running up the sides.

For the sour cream topping:

  1. Blend all ingredients together and set aside unrefrigerated.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Chocolate Gingerbread Cake

Friday, September 26th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is an attention-grabbing, wonderful holiday cake that you will want to make all year round. It is my favorite dark, moist, chewy and nicely-spiced ginger bread cake. Of course I’ve taken the liberty to add a measure of cocoa powder and chocolate to make it perfectly Choclatique-worthy. It can’t help being awesome, fragrant, and smelling a lot like Christmas. I give this cake 5 spicy “yums.”

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Bake Time: 40-45 minutes
Yield: Serves 10 to 12

Ingredients:
1 cup dark, blackstrap molasses
1 cup boiling water
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup vegetable oil
2 large eggs
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon powdered ginger
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon mace
1/8 teaspoon sweet anise
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup Choclatique Ebony Dark Chocolate Pastilles

For the topping:
8 ounces heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
2 teaspoons Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Directions:

  • Preheat an oven to 350° F.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine the molasses and the boiling water and mix.
  • Add the sugar and vegetable oil and stir well. Let this mixture cool to lukewarm before adding the eggs to prevent them from cooking and mix well.
  • Add the flour, baking soda, spices and salt and mix until you have a smooth batter.
  • Fold in the white chocolate pastilles.
  • Pour the batter into a greased 9 x 13 pan and bake 30 to 40 minutes, until it is springy and pulling away from the sides of the pan or until a cake tester inserted in the middle comes out clean.
  • Serve with dollops of whipped cream.

For the topping:

  1. Place a large bowl with the beaters for your mixer in the freezer. Make sure the cream itself is thoroughly chilled as well.
  2. Sift the confectioner’s sugar into a bowl.
  3. Pour the cream into the frozen bowl and beat at high speed until it begins to thicken. Gradually add the confectioners’ sugar and beat until soft peaks form. Add the vanilla extract. Keep beating the cream for about 5 to 8 minutes, until the cream is whipped and stiff. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Dark Chocolate-Cherry Fudge

Friday, September 19th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

The origin and history of fudge is unclear, but fudge is thought to be an American invention. Most believe the first batch was a result of an accidental botched or “fudged” batch of caramels where chocolate was accidentally added in, hence the name “fudge.” The first known sale of fudge was in 1886 in Baltimore and sold for 40 cents a pound. In 1888, a student asked for the fudge recipe, and made 30 pounds of fudge to sell at the Vassar Senior Auction. Fudge became the new fashion confection after word spread to other women’s colleges of the tasty confection. Later, Smith and Wellesley schools each developed their own recipe for fudge.

Prep Time: 8 minutes
Cook Time: 6 minutes
Total Time: 14 minutes
Yield: 48 pieces

Ingredients:
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
2/3 cup evaporated Milk
2 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups miniature marshmallows
1 2/3 cups Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
3/4 cup dried cherries (or candied), coarsely chopped
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon almond extract

Directions:

  1. Line an 8-inch-square baking pan with foil.
  2. Combine the sugar, evaporated milk, butter and salt in medium, heavy-bottom saucepan. Bring to the mixture to a rolling boil over medium heat, stirring constantly.
  3. Boil, stirring the mixture constantly, for 4 minutes. Remove from heat.
  4. Stir in the marshmallows, chocolate chips, dried cherries and extracts.
  5. Using an electric mixer, vigorously blend for 2 minutes or until marshmallows are fully incorporated.
  6. Pour into the prepared baking pan.
  7. Refrigerate for about 2 hours until firm.
  8. Lift from the pan; remove foil. Cut into 48 equal pieces.

ChefSecret: For a delicious variation on this fudge recipe substitute the cherries with a dried berry blend, dried blueberries, apricots, candied pineapple, walnuts, almonds or pistachios.

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What’s Not To Love About Chocolate?

Friday, September 12th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In my book, Choclatique—150 Simply 150 Elegant Desserts, I compared chocolate to the food of the gods. Not only does chocolate make us feel good emotionally, according to a growing community of medical researchers and health professionals it also contributes positively to our physical well being.

As I have written before, eating chocolate improves physical health. A substantial amount of research shows that cocoa flavanols may help control blood pressure and improve cardiovascular health overall. Eating dark chocolate, low in sugar, may also help control blood sugar, and prevents the growth of 1caries which is the bacteria that causes dental cavities. And preliminary research suggests that cocoa flavanols may boost brain health and memory. Scientists aren’t sure how it happens, but surmise that cocoa flavanols may increase blood flow—and therefore oxygen—to the brain. Increasing blood to certain parts of the male anatomy also helps ones’ sex life. Chocolate may very well do for that part of the body what Viagra does, but for far less money.

It turns out that chocolate-lovers may even be more lovable and better lovers! A study published in 2012 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that people who love sweets are likely to be more “sweet.” This may be caused by a change in brain chemistry. The consumption of chocolate floods the brain with dopamine which lights up the reward center of the brain and lifts mood. You can actually see it on a MRI.

The five words that we’ve chosen to identify with chocolate at Choclatique are Passion, Joy, Delight, Desire and Seduction. Following on the latter, one of the most seductive qualities of good chocolate is that it melts precisely at human body temperature, which provides a sensual experience unlike any other food.

Yes, chocolate may truly be the food of the gods.

1 Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or a cavity, is an infection, bacterial in origin, that causes demineralization and destruction of the hard tissues of the teeth—enamel, dentin and cementum. It is a result of the production of acid by bacterial fermentation of food debris accumulated on the tooth surface. If demineralization exceeds saliva and other remineralization factors such as from calcium and fluoridated toothpastes, these once hard tissues progressively break down, producing dental caries or cavities. Today, caries remain one of the most common diseases throughout the world.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Brownie Biscotti

Friday, September 5th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Here is a fun recipe when you can’t make up your mind if you want a rich fudgy brownie or a crisp, Italian-style cookie. In this recipe you get the best of both—the luscious chocolate taste of a homemade brownie combined with the delightful crunch of biscotti. These are the perfect café cookie, made for dunking in coffee or hot chocolate.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Bake Time: 20 to 25 minutes
Cool Time: 30 minutes
Second Bake Time: 20 minutes
Yield: 24 pieces

Ingredients:
1/3 cup unsalted butter, softened
2/3 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/3 cup Choclatique Natura Unsweetened Cocoa Powder or Rouge Cocoa Powder
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup Choclatique Dark Chocolate Chips
1/4 cup lightly roasted pecans, chopped

1 large egg yolk, beaten
1 tablespoon cold water

Directions:>/b>

  1. Preheat the oven to 375° F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment or waxed paper.
  3. In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until smooth.
  4. Beat in the vanilla and eggs, one at a time.
  5. In a separate bowl, sift the flour, cocoa powder and baking powder.
  6. Using an electric mixer blend the creamed mixture on low until well blended.
  7. The dough will be stiff and sticky.
  8. Using a large spoon stir in the chocolate chips and nuts.
  9. Divide the dough into two equal parts and place on prepared baking sheet.
  10. Shape each into 9 x 2 x 1-inch logs 4 inches apart.
  11. Beat the egg yolk and water together ad brush the loaves lightly with the mixture.
  12. Bake for 20-25 minutes, until firm.
  13. Remove the loaves from the pan and cool for 30 minutes.
  14. Using a serrated knife, slice the loaves diagonally into 1-inch slices.
  15. Return the slices to the baking sheet, placing them on their sides.
  16. Reduce heat to 350° and bake for 10 minutes on each side or until dry. Cool completely and store in an airtight container.

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The ChocolateDoctor Doughnut History Distorted

Friday, August 22nd, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

I read an article the other day that just got me damn mad. Heather Falvey, a so called British historian is now claiming that America didn’t invent the doughnut. How can that be? It is Homer Simpson’s favorite snack and US cops are addicted to them. Have you ever seen an English Bobby eating a doughnut? No, of course not! They eat fish and chips. Listen here, the doughnut is as American as apple pie. I don’t care that this Britt recently unearthed 213-year-old recipe book that puts the doughnut’s legacy into British hands. She claims that Baroness Elizabeth Dimsdale of Hertfordshire was given the recipe by the originator of the doughnut (or “dow nut” as she put it) in 1800, but it’s unclear who this unnamed woman is. The book recipe doesn’t give a lot of instructions on how to make them; It’s more what to use. Who knows, shaped differently, they could be just another English scone. So here’s the real story.

The origin of doughnuts has a disputed history, but it’s all within America. After all, why do you think they call the United States the Promised Land? One theory suggests they were invented in North America by Dutch settlers, who were responsible for popularizing other American desserts, including cookies, apple and cream pie and cobbler. In the 19th century, doughnuts were sometimes referred to as one kind of oliekoek (a Dutch word literally meaning “oil cake”), a “sweetened cake fried in lard.

Hanson Gregory, an American, claimed to have invented the ring-shaped doughnut in 1847 aboard a lime-trading ship when he was only 16 years old. Gregory was dissatisfied with the greasiness of doughnuts twisted into various shapes and with the raw center of regular doughnuts. He claimed to have punched a hole in the center of dough with the ship’s tin pepper box, and later taught the technique to his mother.

According to anthropologist Paul R. Mullins, the first cookbook mentioning doughnuts was an 1803 English volume which included doughnuts in an appendix of American recipes. I believe the anthropology of man, and our nation, can be traced more accurately through the foods and beverages of time, rather than through the riches of art, the prose of literature, the rhythm of music or the structure of architecture. So quit trying to steal our legacy, Heather Falvey, doughnuts belong to America and with a doughnut all things are possible.

Ed’s Chocolate Glazed Yeast Doughnuts

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Proof Time: 30 to 40 minutes
Fry Time: 2 minutes
Ready in: 1 hour
Yield: 2 baker’s dozen doughnuts (that’s 26!)

Ingredients:
For the Doughnuts:

3 1/4 ounce packages “Rapid Rise” yeast (3/4 oz total)
1/2 cup warm water (105-115ºF)
2 1/4 cups whole milk, scalded, then cooled
1 cup granulate sugar
2 teaspoons salt
3 large eggs
1/2 cup shortening
7 cups, plus 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
1/2 cup Choclatique Rouge Unsweetened Cocoa Powder, sifted
canola oil for frying

For the Glaze:
1/2 cup unsalted butter
3 cups powdered sugar, sifted
6 ounce Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate
2 1/4 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
6-9 tablespoons evaporated milk

Directions:
For the Doughnuts:

  1. Proof the yeast by mixing 1 tablespoon of flour with the warm water. Mix it up and let it rest.
  2. Scald the milk in a microwave or on top of a stove, and let cool.
  3. Combine the yeast mixture, cooled milk, sugar, salt, eggs, shortening and 2 1/2 cups of flour and cocoa powder.
  4. Beat on low speed for 30 seconds, scrape down the bowl.
  5. Beat on medium speed for 2 minutes, scraping bowl occasionally.
  6. Carefully stir in remaining flour until the dough is smooth and silky.
  7. Cover the dough and let rise until it doubles, about 30-60 minutes, depending on the yeast you used.
  8. After the dough has risen, turn dough onto floured surface; roll around lightly to coat with flour.
  9. Gently roll dough 1/2-inch thick with floured rolling pin.
  10. Cut with floured doughnut cutter. Separate donuts and holes, as they take different frying times.
  11. Cover and let them rise until doubled in sizes, about 30-40 minutes.

Note: Save your scraps! They are both great to test your fry time and to snack on while you’re making the rest!

Note: If you want to make these donuts for breakfast, let the donuts rise in the refrigerator overnight!

Directions
For the Glaze:

Make the glaze before frying so it can sit at room temperature until the donuts are fried and ready to be dipped.

  1. Melt the butter and chocolate and stir in powdered sugar, cocoa powder and vanilla until blended.
  2. Add the milk until desired consistency is reached.

For Frying the Doughnuts:

  1. Use a deep pan to heat the oil.
  2. Using a frying thermometer heat the oil to 350ºF. Use some of the scraps of the doughnut dough to test different frying times.
  3. Carefully place the donuts in the oil. Cook on each side for about one minute. Use chopsticks to flip the donuts and remove them from the oil.
  4. Place donuts on a rack or paper towels to drain.

For Glazing the Doughnuts:

  1. Dip the doughnuts in the glaze and set them on a rack to dry. It okay to dipped both sides of the doughnuts in the glaze.
  2. Let them set for 10 minutes to set.

ChefSecret: Scalding the milk prevents an enzyme from killing the yeast. If you don’t scald it first to kill the enzyme, the donuts won’t rise.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Cape Cod White Chocolate-Cranberry Bog Cookies

Friday, August 15th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

Cranberries are thought to be an indispensable part of our traditional American Thanksgiving and Christmas dinner feasts. For some reason, my mother seems to forget to serve the cranberries during holiday dinners. She used to find it still in the “fridge” when putting away the leftovers. Not wanting to cheat anyone out of their holiday cranberries, I created this recipe using dried cranberries (and chocolate, of course). I think you will find that tart cranberries are the perfect balance for Choclatique’s Snowy White Chocolate Chips.

Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 to 12 minutes
Ready In: 1 hour
Yield: 36 Cookies

Ingredients:
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter
1/4 cup granulated sugar
3/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
1 (3.5 ounce) package Jell-O® Instant Vanilla Pudding Mix
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon fresh orange zest
2 large eggs
1 cup Choclatique Snowy White Chocolate Chips
1/2 cup dried cranberries

Directions:

  1. Preheat an oven to 350º F.
  2. Lightly spray two baking sheets with food release.
  3. Combine the flour and baking soda in a bowl and whisk.
  4. Cream the butter, white sugar and brown sugar and with an electric mixer in a large bowl until creamy and smooth; add the instant pudding mix and continue to beat.
  5. Beat the first egg into the butter mixture until completely blended, and then beat in the vanilla and the orange zest with the last egg.
  6. Mix in the flour mixture until just incorporated. It’s okay to see a little flour.
  7. Fold in the white chocolate chips and cranberries; mixing just enough to evenly combine.
  8. Using a 1 ounce scoop or 2 tablespoons drop the dough 2 inches apart onto the sprayed baking sheets.
  9. Bake in the preheated oven until edges of the cookies become golden brown—about 10 to 12 minutes.
  10. Cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes before removing to cool completely on a wire rack.

ChefSecret: You can substitute dried cranberries with dried cherries or blueberries, but then it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving, would it? You can also substitute the orange zest with tangerine or lemon zest.

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The ChocolateDoctor’s Bumpy, Rocky Road

Friday, August 8th, 2014
Ed Engoron, Co-Founder of Choclatique Author of Ed Engoron’s Choclatique, Running Press, 2011

In 1950, a Russian Immigrant, Sam Altshuler started the The Annabelle Candy Company in San Francisco. The company was named after Sam’s daughter. It’s like I have always believed, all great trends start in California and Rocky Road was no exception.

The company currently makes 10 different candy bars. Rocky Road, the original marshmallow, chocolate, and cashews bar currently ranks among the top 35 best selling chocolate bars on the West Coast. Annabelle also makes Big Hunk, Look, U-NO and Abba-Zaba candy bars—all my favorites.

This recipe is my take on Sam’s famous, original Rocky Road bar. It’s easy to prepare and makes for wonderful food gifts for Christmas or Easter. If you don’t want to go to the trouble of making it, you can find an Annabelle Rocky Road bar in a candy aisle near you.

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Cool Time: 2 hours
Yield: 10 Bars

Ingredients:
8 ounces Choclatique Heirloom Milk Chocolate
2 1/2 ounces Choclatique Private Reserve Dark Chocolate
3/4 ounce unsalted butter
1 3/4 ounces mixed mini marshmallows
1 3/4 ounces butter shortbread cookies, chopped into mini marshmallow size sized pieces
3 1/2 ounces salted cashews nuts
3/4 ounce dried cherries

Directions:

  1. Line a 3 x 10-inch loaf pan with plastic food wrap.
  2. Place the milk and dark chocolates with the butter in a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water (don’t let the bowl touch the water); then stir until melted.
  3. Stir marshmallows, cashews and dried cherries into chocolate.
  4. Spread into pan, chill in fridge for 2 hours or until hard. Remove from the pan by lifting the edges of the plastic food wrap.
  5. Slice into 1-inch wide bars on a clean dry cutting board.

ChefSecret: You can replace the cashews with roasted and salted macadamia nuts or blanched, roasted and salted almonds. Any crisp cookie can be used in place of the butter shortbread.

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